Archives for medication

bipolar

Branding Psychotherapy: A New Quick Fix

In this morning's New York Times magazine, former journalist Lori Gottlieb wrote a feature titled The Branding Cure, My so-called career as a therapist, about the dying practice of psychotherapy. As a newly minted psychotherapist, she sat in her empty office awaiting patients to flock to her door for her help. They neither flocked nor walked. They stayed away in droves.

No more traditional psychotherapy?


In an effort to find...
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bipolar

Day 10: How My Dogs Keep Me Sane, Part One…

A daily blog post on mental health and wellness is a real challenge.

More than I imagined when I blithely began this blogathon on June 11 on a whim after reading about Margarita Tartakovsky's success on her 31-day blogathon.

I want to stay hard and close to my subject, Coming Out Crazy, but there are times when I long to digress.

And if the truth...
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bipolar

Day Four: Graduating With My PhD in Me

This morning I saw my psychiatrist Dr. Bob for the first time since May 16. One month ago.

"My exit strategy"...

We're spacing out our appointments. Seeing each other monthly. This is all part of my "exit strategy" from my psychiatric psychotherapy.

Dr. Bob and I began seeing each other in 1990. That's 22 years of life-changing therapy.

This past February he spent six weeks at Addis Ababa University teaching psychiatric residents through an exchange program...
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anxiety

Is There An End In Sight? Part 2…

There's a mysterious, somewhat strange-sounding convention in psychiatry, I think. I'm not sure. I've never imagined it would apply to me, so I've never bothered to investigate it.

I've steered far away from. It scares me.

Leaving

Here's how it was explained to me at the Eating Disorders Outpatient program I just completed. And remember, an eating disorder is a psychiatric illness.

For a minimum of two years, I was told, I could not go back to...
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bipolar

My Reunion With Dr. Bob, Part 1…

As anyone acquainted with me and this blog knows, I see a psychiatrist regularly for my mood disorder. We started seeing each other in 1991.

He's an unusual

Dr. Bob is not a psychoanalyst like my first psychotherapist back in 1960. She was Jungian and probably one of the only therapists to treat children like me in Toronto.

"A very, very, very difficult child," I've been told time and again...
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advocacy

Trauma…


This post is in response to Dr. Suzanne Phillips and Dianne Kane's fascinating Healing Together for Couples post on Hoarding Behaviour.

By the way, yesterday, somehow, it was accidentally posted, unfinished!

I'm so

Now it's here, camera ready, as they used to say in those by-gone days of print. :)

It began as a comment, but was so long, I decided to post about it.

So, thank you, "Phillips and...
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Trauma…

This post is in response to Dr. Suzanne Phillips and Dianne Kane's fascinating Healing Together for Couples post on Hoarding Behaviour.

It began as a comment, but was so long, I decided to post about it.

Thank you for the inspiration.

It struck a chord.

Also, I've had personal experience with hoarding and hoarders.

Don't you think almost all of our behaviours are as a result of some sort of "trauma" in our lives. We're attempting to fill a void inside of us...
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discrimination

“Open Dialogue” ~ Treating Psychosis in Finland, Part 1…

Yesterday, in my Leadership in Society class, the second last class of the term, my students discussed change.
Our discussion was based on an assignment I had given them. A written assignment. But their real ideas and feelings tend to come out in live conversation. When they engage.

Disatisfaction with the status

They're pretty unhappy at the campus where I teach. It's small. Formerly an insurance building. Never meant to be a college campus.

That's what they want...
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advocacy

Beyond Recovery, Part 2…

A self-determination

Copeland, WRAP's founder, has a dramatic recovery story beginning with her mother, Kate, who was taken at age 37 to a mental institution in the late 1940s.

She was diagnosed as incurably insane. Her doctors told her family to forget about this once vibrant and accomplished woman — she would never get well.

Doctors were

Kate began improving. Her mood swings became less severe. Several hospital personnel took a special interest in her, encouraging her...
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