10 thoughts on “Living Life on Autopilot? 3 Steps to Find Your Vitality

  • February 22, 2015 at 5:45 pm

    I’ve never heard anyone validate the concept of “living on autopilot”, yet I’ve used that phrase to describe my own life multiple times since I was in junior high. I don’t usually comment on blog posts anywhere, but this one makes me feel like I’m not entirely broken. Definitely trying the exercise. Thank you.

    Reply
    • February 22, 2015 at 5:59 pm

      That’s great to hear Sarah. Thanks for your comment!

      Reply
  • February 22, 2015 at 8:01 pm

    Auto pilot is a great way to put it. It’s amazing how much the body and mind can survive when where are basically asleep at the wheel. I’m so fortunate to not have created to much damage and can handle what I am waking up to. The Non Violent Communication website has free PDF emotions and needs list. Like emotions when our needs aren’t met and a list of emotions when they are met. I definenlty needed a cheat sheet and found it useful for exercises like this. Great article thanks.

    Reply
  • February 24, 2015 at 11:05 pm

    I’ve been diagnosed with an unknown type of schizoid disorder since I was 8 years old and schizoaffective disorder bipolar type since I was roughly 13 years old. I’m now in my forties. This is the first time I’ve heard the phrase Auto Pilot (used in the context of this subject). I was able to easily answer “yes” to each and every question.

    I’ve actually taught myself some of the techniques mentioned in the above article and I’ve made more progress doing so than I ever had with medication, therapy, or hospitalization. There is a lot of truth with what was mentioned here, and the potential results.

    Reply
  • February 25, 2015 at 11:00 am

    Dr. Webb, I am sorry for posting this here, but the ‘contact me’ link on your site seems not to work. In any event, this may be of interest to others as well. I was wondering if you have any guidance about finding a therapist who works in the emotional neglect area? Your posts have really resonated with me. It looks from your area code like you are in Boston, and unfortunately I recently moved from there and I missed my chance to work with you. Are there any organizations or particular ways I could find someone with similar practice interests locally, or is this something that most competent therapists would be familiar with? Thank you if you can help. Feel free to email directly if you like (I think this comment will show that to you).

    Reply
    • February 25, 2015 at 1:18 pm

      Hi James, I’m sorry my website was spammed and is down for maintenance. It will be up in the next day or so. I get your question a lot and wrote a blog post on my site about how to find a CEN therapist. Here’s the link: http://www.drjonicewebb.com/how-to-find-a-good-cen-therapist/ Sorry you won’t be able to acces it for a while. Take care!

      Reply
      • February 25, 2015 at 5:32 pm

        thank you!

        Reply
  • February 25, 2015 at 11:00 am

    Thank you so much for this article! It really struck a cord with me. Thank you for opening my eyes to something I wasn’t even aware others suffered with. It explains a little of why I am the way I am. Thank you!

    Reply
  • February 25, 2015 at 2:02 pm

    There was a time when I worked really hard to get my feelings back. I did very well, I was crying a lot, felt happy and connected, felt very okay with feeling. (I can’t even remember the last time I felt connected to others, it was a great feeling!) The first time in my life, memories of my childhood/teen years popping up. It was exciting, yet scary because I felt flooded by emotions when the memories came back, many times instantly sobbing. I felt this healthy release from finally letting myself let it out. I started opening up to others and sharing more. But now I have hit a roadblock. I have convinced myself it is not safe to feel. I try to remind myself that there is nothing wrong with it, but I hesitate believing that now. My therapist keeps reminding me that I am a “truth speaker”, which is a very awesome thing, and that my angry serves a purpose.

    Reply
  • March 25, 2015 at 9:50 pm

    When you do this exercise and are able to find the words to describe the way you feel, in that five minutes, and then at other times throughout the day as you get better at identifying, what do you do with that information? Will I inherently feel better once I can recognize the feelings?

    Reply
 

Join the Conversation!

We invite you to share your thoughts and tell us what you think in this public forum. Before posting, please read our blog moderation guidelines. A first name or pseudonym is required and will be displayed with your comment. Your email address is also required, but will be kept private. (Please note that we use gravatars here, which are tied to your email address.) A website/blog/twitter address is optional.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *