Many of us struggle to make our own happiness and health a priority. It just feels like we spend much of our days making sure that someone else’s well is full while ours runs empty. Kesha recently penned an essay for Teen Vogue detailing the struggle she’s undergone to recover from her eating disorder and allegedly being abused by her former producer. Considering the target audience for that publication, her words are pretty important.

She addresses certain issues head-on with incredible honesty and compassion. “I know from personal experience how comments can mess up somebody’s self-confidence and sense of self-worth,” Kesha wrote. “I have felt so unlovable after reading cruel words written by strangers who don’t know a thing about me.”

Right now, we are bombarded all day with images that depict some arbitrary form of perfection. An ideal that is unattainable to most women. Whether it’s the cover of a magazine or some popular Instagram account, the message is neverending. While most of us can hide from cameras during our rough days, Kesha discovered that her battle with body image was going to take place on the public stage.

“Seeing paparazzi photos of myself and the accompanying catty commentary fueled my eating disorder,” Kesha wrote. “The sick irony was that when I was at some of the lowest points in my life, I kept hearing how much better I looked. I knew I was destroying my body with my eating disorder, but the message I was getting was that I was doing great.”

How terrifying. First of all, who are we to comment on whether someone “looks better” from the outside of their life? We don’t know what they are going through. What is our opinion based on? That same skewed perception of what a female body should look like? The one that has been fed to us by fashion designers and Hollywood movies?

Fortunately, Kesha was able to find a health perspective and said: “I’ve realized that once you take the step to help yourself, you’re going to be so happy you did. Taking the time to work on yourself requires bravery. With this essay, I want to pass along the message to anyone who struggles with an eating disorder, or depression, or anxiety, or anything else, that if you have physical or emotional scars, don’t be ashamed of them, because they are part of you. Remember that beauty comes in all shapes and sizes. And that no one can take the magic you make.”

What a beautiful message. Hopefully, her words and strength will resound with Teen Vogue‘s young readers and empower them.