bigstock--135449348One of the toughest things that can happen in life is the loss of a loved one. Celine Dion and Kathie Lee Gifford know this truth all too well. Dion’s husband and manager, Rene Angelil, passed away from a lengthy battle with cancer this past January and Gifford’s husband, Frank, died almost a year ago.

When the 48-year-old singer visited the Today show this morning, she and the talk show host bonded over their grief. Gifford opened up the discussion by saying: “You have been as I have been this past year …We’ve been on quite the journey. We are still on one.”

She cried as Dion explained: “I lost the man of my life but I cannot live thinking this way. I have to say, ‘I found the best man in the world.’ Like you did for yourself. We were both extremely lucky. The luggage that we have, we will carry for the rest of our lives and show our kids that mom is fine, and you’re gonna be OK.”

Gifford added, after admitting to having not cried about Frank’s death yet: “And we’re all going up someday. If I concentrate on what I lost, then I will be in despair but if I concentrate on what I still have, all of God’s blessings. I still have my beautiful children, my husband, the same way you do. …We are in a state of what’s called grace, and I think that’s because God gives you what you need when you need it. We have actually been rejoicing as a family since Frank went to be with the Lord. …We have peace about it.”

Undoubtedly, there had to be viewers at home who were feeling similarly about their own losses and were touched by the interaction between the women. Earlier in the day, Dion had opened up to Matt Lauer about how hard it had been to watch her husband suffering for years and expressed relief that his death was peaceful. Again, I’m sure there were members of the home audience who could attest to feeling similarly about the passing of someone they cared about.

It’s important to talk about these real issues because almost all of us can relate in some way. Life isn’t just about the happy times and the low moments can really help us appreciate the good in the world.