LOS ANGELES - JAN 16:  Kate Hudson, son at the Kung Fu Panda 3 PWe’ve all been there, haven’t we? Raising children is incredibly difficult, at times, regardless of how well-off a family might seem. Sure, wealthy parents may be better able to provide financially for their offspring but that’s not what it’s all about. Celebrities aren’t perfect, despite their carefully crafted veneers, and neither are their relationships and, more and more, we are living in a time when even the biggest household names are admitting their struggles.

Kate Hudson comes from Hollywood royalty. Her mother, Goldie Hawn, is a living legend, her stepfather is the incredible Kurt Russell, and her dad, Bill Hudson, is an acclaimed musician and actor. She seems to have handled life in the spotlight with grace but, after becoming a mother, she seems to understand that balancing everything can be a real challenge.

Recently, she wrote the cover story, “Sometimes I Feel Like a Bad Mom” for InStyle in which she expresses her feelings about being a modern, working mom while trying to give her sons, Ryder (12) and Bingham (4), a happy life.

She wrote: “I was really young, like, 23, when I had Ryder. So, our relationship has always been [a little unusual]. I mean, we’re close, and I am his mom. I’m big on manners. I’m big on politeness. I’m big on gratitude. But I’m a bit of a wild mom. Some days I feel like I should win best mom of the day award, and some days I find myself doing strange things that don’t have any real purpose, in faraway corners in my house, and I realize I am literally and deliberately hiding from my children.”

While she points to the fact that she was younger when she had Ryder, I think that parents of all ages can relate to doing that. Most of us can relate to hiding out in the bathroom for longer than necessary just to get a few minutes of breathing space. Does that make us bad parents? No. It makes us human but it’s great that she’s bringing the issue to the forefront so that we can all commiserate together about our guilt over those stolen moments.

The truth is that, no matter how much we love our children, the process of caring for someone else’s needs 24/7 for 18 years is emotionally and physically draining. Hopefully, Hudson’s article helps other parents realize that it’s okay and normal to have their own needs and that self-care, even if it’s just 10 sneaky minutes in the toilet, can go a long way to preserving their sanity.