LOS ANGELES - NOV 23:  Kendall Jenner arrives to the 2014 AmericTeenage acne is common, as is the associated embarrassment over it but it’s always interesting to hear a celebrity open up about how they handled a rite of passage that is happening in high school classrooms and hallways across the country.

It’s hard to imagine the smooth-faced model with any blemishes on her skin but, she says that it was a struggle. In a post on her webpage, the Keeping Up with the Kardashians star shared her experience during that tough and transitional time.

The 19-year-old wrote of her acne: “Where it really impacted me was how self-conscious I became about it. It completely ruined my self-esteem. I wouldn’t even look at people when I talked to them. I felt like such an outcast; when I spoke, it was with my hand covering my face.”

Most of us have lived through exactly those feelings and have done similar things. I only had a few pimples in my teen years but, one time, I was so horrified that I put a bandaid over it. Of course, my classmates accused me of trying to cover up a zit and it was even more embarrassing to try to deny it!

Unlike me, Kendall, at least, had three older sisters (Kim, Kourtney and Khloe) to help guide her through the tough times. In her post, she described feeling relieved by the support: “I was thankful we always talked about it in my family. They would help me work on my feelings about it and how I would move past that stage of my life. I remember on Christmas Eve one year, I was sitting in my bedroom upstairs crying and Kim walked in and we talked about it together — she felt so bad for me.”

To combat the acne, her sisters told Kendall to “never pick” at pimples and to avoid touching her face. That’s common advice that most “normal” teens have heard but Kendall also had access to things reserved for people who can afford it. For example, she also began Laser Genesis treatments with a dermatologist to reduce redness and scarring.

It been more than three years since she had a serious breakout but Kendall hasn’t quite forgotten how bad it felt but it’s improving every day. She wrote: “Slowly, I’m working towards not caring and I’m just in so much of a better place about it all now that I’m older. I realized that it’s a part of life for some people and it doesn’t define who you are.”

Absolutely. The same can be said for many of the issues facing teenagers. It may seem hard to believe, at the time, but things can and will get better.