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Why Carrie Fisher Became A Spokeswoman For Bipolar Disorder


In light of the release of Wishful Drinking, Carrie Fisher’s new memoir, Newsweek published excerpts of an interview with the actress/script doctor/bipolar disorder spokeswoman late last week.

Especially of interest is Fisher’s answer when interviewer Ramin Setoodeh asks her about her decision to advocate for bipolar disorder awareness. Fisher tosses in a few intriguing exchanges between herself and her doctors, but really sounds the horns when she calls out insurance companies and their mental health coverage – or, lack thereof.

You know, I think I really like Carrie Fisher.

And no, no, I haven’t read the memoir yet. I haven’t read much of anything lately (that I’d admit to, anyway). But, if you’re interested in reading reviews of Wishful Drinking, check out:

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Why Carrie Fisher Became A Spokeswoman For Bipolar Disorder


Alicia Sparks

Alicia Sparks is a freelance writer and editor and the creator of WritingSpark.com, where she blogs to help new freelance writers get their quills in the pot, so to speak. Among animal rights, music, and physical wellness, her passions include mental health and advocacy. Here at Psych Central she works as Syndication Editor as well as authors Your Body, Your Mind, Unleash Your Creativity, and World of Psychology's weekly "Psychology Around the Net."


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APA Reference
Sparks, A. (2019). Why Carrie Fisher Became A Spokeswoman For Bipolar Disorder. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 4, 2020, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/celebrity/2008/12/why-carrie-fisher-became-a-spokeswoman-for-bipolar-disorder/

 

Last updated: 22 Mar 2019
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