4 thoughts on “Balanced Thinking: 5 Ways To Use Your “Wise Mind”

  • February 1, 2018 at 3:24 am

    Hi Tamara,
    Sometimes I wonder if God is trying to tell me something. Like with the topic of “mindfulness” lol. It seems it is coming up in my life consistently over time. I guess at least in some areas, it COULD be helpful…
    I am pretty sure I could easily be one of those you mention that can “over-think” things. I know there have even been times when I’ve had to get input from my therapist because I am having a certain thought or issue that is causing me great anxiety and I can obsess about it if I let it “spin” too long lol. Thankfully, that doesn’t happen as often as it used to but I still feel somewhat vulnerable to it.
    Given recent events in my life (former stepfather’s death as well as medical issues I am having) I do think mindfulness can help. I’m going to watch the video to make sure I understand what it is and maybe try and use it later today as I face a somewhat painful (as well as potentially emotionally triggering) exam and medical test.
    I hope you are doing well!

    Reply
    • February 16, 2018 at 12:55 pm

      Hi Lori,
      Thanks for commenting. I think God does speak to us through multiple channels of our life. I find that if a message is repeated it is from God.
      I find that mindfulness is most helpful when you are rested or tired. The reason I say this is because you are more likely to yield to quiet time. I find scripture is a nice way for me to refocus my attention and have a mindful moment. Calming music or a guided meditation. Headspace is an app that might benefit you and others here: https://www.headspace.com/headspace-meditation-app.

      Take care and I hope you are well too!

      Reply
  • February 1, 2018 at 7:12 pm

    This is very interesting. I like the bit about CBT and DBT being very similar. I may in fact have altered my CBT processing to DBT as I came to terms with CEN and PTSD over a long time.
    This probably happened when I fully understood the PTSD driver the amygdala, and the way it overrode the ACC and PFC even when the trigger was sometimes a mere metaphor of the actual event.
    Since my PTSD issue was about heights, I began to understand the neurotic impulses when confronted by large flat fronted vehicles approaching if I was standing at a bus stop. They were to my irrational mind mimicking falling.
    Bit by bit I’ve been collecting this type of fake data and putting it a sort of inner reference library, so that I’m not going to have a highly strung overreaction.
    Taken a while, and Im not fond of being in mesh cage lifts, and take offs and landings can be tense, but having a handle on the chemical processes helps no end to rewrite the neural pathways and widen the safe area. I suppose thats equanimity.
    Funnily I was always mystified as to who I really am, because I saw in others a sense of centre I never had.
    Now I don’t think that matters at all. I guess thats called feeling Ok.

    Reply
    • February 4, 2018 at 9:04 pm

      Hi Sandy,
      Thank you for your comment and for sharing your experience. They are indeed very similar and I think a lot of people fail to recognize that.
      When I meet with clients who have PTSD I often engage them, without them even knowing, in DBT activities to help with emotion regulation. Then we move into CBT stuff at some point.

      I think we all find ourselves in a battle of the mind and at other times a “battle of the emotions.” It’s difficult to unravel ourselves from this trap. I’m sure many people can relate to your experience.
      Take care

      Reply
 

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