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3 Signs That You May Be a Facebook Narcissist

Over Sharing

– You share your thoughts about random elements daily

Your daily posts about how you feel about news, folks in Wal-Mart and the children’s hobbies and friends can be a bit much.

– Daily or almost daily selfies

If I just saw your selfie yesterday, I don’t really need to see it again today. Heck, I wouldn’t even want to see daily selfies of Idris Elba and I really love, love, love Idris Elba.

-You take pictures of food you are eating

Screams “I am not used to food that looks this good, tastes this good or costs this much, so I need to share it and prove it to my Facebook friends.

– Pictures of you in the car every day or week reeks of low self-esteem.

“I can’t wait to see pictures of my Facebook friends in their cars today,” says no one ever.

— My favorite- posts about clothes, shoes and cars.

Now I like shoes, but nothing says “I need to show these items to let you-my FB friends- know that I am special, rich, smart or valuable like posting pics of your stuff”

As a psychologist I find it both disheartening and fascinating. There is a widespread belief that items with certain names/brands make you look and feel important. We have morphed into a society that depends on superficial items to determine our worth. Who doesn’t enjoy quality items, but if quality were the priority, we would just share, “I purchased a well-made leather purse today and I love it!”

Over Friending

– There must be some FB rule that states that more FB friends equal a better person. Perhaps I missed the memo.

Research states that the more Facebook friends one has, the more they need an audience. There is no way that you can personally know each one of your FB friends over 1000. It is an outward statement that you want and need more people to see you and validate your worth……… Unless of course you are a celebrity……… when in this case, your FaceBook friends are fans and help to build or maintain your brand.

Over Checking

-Constantly on FB all day long.

I have no idea how people do it.

If you incessantly post to Facebook then you have to incessantly check for comments as well!

We behave as if we will miss out on a life altering event by unplugging from Social media. Let’s attempt to be more strategic about we spend our time in 2015. For instance, that 30 minutes each day that you devoted to Facebook, could have been spent many other ways. 30 minutes a day amounts to 15 hours a month or 180 hours in a year solely devoted to Facebook. With 15 hours each month, you could pick up a new hobby, work overtime at your job, volunteer at a local organization, start a new sport or fitness activity or simply catch up on sleep. It amounts to 7.5 days each year that could be spent on a lovely vacation with the people in your life that you cherish the most.

3 Signs That You May Be a Facebook Narcissist

This article has been updated from the original version, which was originally published here on January 5, 2015.


Dr.J

Dr. Jameca W. Falconer is an accomplished Counseling psychologist, educator, entrepreneur, and civic leader. With clinical expertise in geriatric psychology, Dr. Falconer is one of the leading providers of psychotherapy services to older adults in St. Louis. After recognizing the overwhelming need for mental health services among older African Americans in St. Louis, Dr. Falconer launched her psychotherapy practice in 2006.


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APA Reference
J, D. (2019). 3 Signs That You May Be a Facebook Narcissist. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 17, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/blog/2018/01/3-signs-that-you-may-be-a-facebook-narcissist/

 

Last updated: 13 May 2019
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