going to work photo

Bipolar and Looking for Work

If you do not have a career and are not working right now, you might be thinking that you would like to. If you have Bipolar disorder, and you are currently stable, chances are you worked hard for your recovery. With that said, finding the right job might be the next step in your recovery process. Last post explored important steps to take in order to keep that stable balance for those of you who are already working. Today, we will look at six important things to keep in mind if you are someone with bipolar who is getting ready to get out there and experience the life of employment.

1. Protect your need to regenerate and your sleep cycle. It is generally not advised to take a job that requires shit work, or night work, or on call work. It is difficult to create a regular routine with this kind of work. This can disturb your sleep patterns and could make you vulnerable to decompensate (a manic or depressive episode.

2. Check out the environment. It is often suggested that people who are sensitive to stress do better in quiet work environments, or relaxed workspaces that facilitate concentration.

3. Check out the values and typical behaviors of the people that you might be working with. Try to find a work place that is likely to have people who are not likely to try to talk you into going out for a drink or do things that could disturb your recovery. You want ot work with people who will honor your boundaries and your values.

4. Consider taking some vocational tests to see how your own specific interested, aptitudes, beliefs, preferences, talents, educational level, and personality are integrated. There are many tests deigned to help you explore what type of work is most suitable for you.

5. If you do not have a college degree, consider starting your career as a student at the local community college. The community college experience provides the student with many opportunities to discover what they are good at, how they perceive themselves in the work place, and to develop marketable skills. The college process offers a very nice transition from being a non-worker to having a career. You can go part time three-fourth time, or full time. It is a nice way to help you develop a structure for your life while maintaining your recovery and also experiencing career.

6. Consider what is most important in helping you maintain your recovery. What is helping you now? Is it your wellness and recovery support team”; Is it your regular counseling sessions? Take an inventory of what you have already created in your life that supports your current level of stability. When seeking a job, look for a job that will support your continuation with your current wellness and recovery, and will not interfere with what you need in your life to maintain stability.

Photo by avrene