4 thoughts on “Becoming More Aware of Depression and Bipolar

  • December 6, 2012 at 9:44 am

    Great information here! In my work as a psychologist-trained Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction coach/consultant, I see that clients who are able to develop self-awareness of mood states and triggers are much more empowered to manage symptoms and live rich, full lives. Thank you.

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    • December 6, 2012 at 12:40 pm

      I am glad you liked it. Please check back for the rest of the series. I will be writing similar articles about understanding, functionality, comfort, value, and time along with how they all fit together.

      Reply
  • December 7, 2012 at 11:05 pm

    I have suffered from clinical depression since 1988. During the first severe episode, I was able to maintain functionality. It became more difficult over the years. However, I’ve always been aware something was wrong and that feeling this way was not normal. I haven’t been able to uncover the triggers for the more severe episodes since I’ve been an adult. It was clear early-on. Right now, I feel the best that I have in like 15 years. My level of functioning has not yet returned to 100%, and I live in fear of relapse. I think you are on to something with this and I hope you continue your research and awareness spreads.

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  • December 13, 2012 at 6:50 pm

    I am so happy that I stumbled upon this blog! I was diagnosed with bipolar 2 in 2001. Prior to my diagnosis, I suffered from very severe, very deep, suicidal depressive episodes, for years. Eleven years after my diagnosis, and after getting therapy, I hardly ever suffer from any mania or depression, and when I do it is very mild. This is because through trial and error, I stumbled on to many of the practices that you’ve mentioned above.

    I always tell my fellow BPers, in order to get BP under control you MUST get control of whatever is going on inside of YOU. There is just no other way around it, I don’t think. You can’t rely on the meds indefinitely. They don’t- not to my experience- work over long periods of time. They cause more problems than they fix…there is a better and easier way. I am so glad that you are out there articulating this!

    In my book, The Way Through Lessons Learned on Life, Love and the Journey, I outline my descent into madness, beginning at age 13 and my journey back to sanity which began at about age 33. Seeing Bipolar Disorder as an “advantage” is a huge shift in perception. BUT it is a shift that we can make! I mean my mania and hypomania’s have certainly taken me to some interesting places! It all sort of makes me go hmmmmmmmm……maybe that Tom Wootton is on to something new and exciting in the BP world!

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