advertisement
Home » Blogs » Your Best Self » How to Make the Most of 2015 By Doing a Year-End-Review

How to Make the Most of 2015 By Doing a Year-End-Review

want to evolve

“Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards.” ― Søren Kierkegaard

The New Year has officially arrived, and if you’re like most people you have some goals for the coming year.

You also probably have goals you didn’t achieve from the past year.

One of the most powerful ways to move into the New Year is to do a year-end-review.

The year-end-review can help you see what has been working well and what hasn’t been working so well.

It can help you recognize the progress you have made, as well as where there are still gaps in your desired lifestyle.

You can learn from the experience of the past year and make the necessary adjustments.

So no matter how your past year went, you can approach 2015 as a clean slate with new opportunities, as well as a more wise and knowledgeable approach to reaching your goals.

It can be helpful to focus on a few key areas to do this exercise.

For instance, I am reviewing the past year using these categories.

  • Financial
  • Career
  • Physical health
  • Spiritual
  • Relationships
  • Leadership

Within each of these categories I do a thorough review of what went well and what didn’t go well, based on what I want to create for the coming year.

First, focus on the high points and the success you experienced. Don’t overlook what is going well and what you can appreciate about the past year. Give yourself time to answer these questions. It can help you learn more about your strengths as well as the behaviors and habits that served you well in 2014.

– What went well over the past year?

– What progress did you make?

– What is currently working?

Next, take some time to acknowledge the low points of 2014. The point of this reflection isn’t to dwell on the negative, but is instead to help you learn from mistakes and create a more effective plan for the coming year.

Use your answer to these questions to help you recognize where you can put more effort or what skills and knowledge you need to gain.

– What didn’t go well over the past year?

– What isn’t working for you currently?

– What were the obstacles in the way?

– What prevented you from reaching your goals?

Lastly, determine what you want to create in the coming year and start designing a plan.

– What are some solutions for the obstacles you listed?

– What are the first steps you can take to start working toward your goals?

– What has to happen in order for you to reach your goals?

The key to improving is realizing that life is about learning and growing.

If something didn’t go well find out why before you decide to give up.

Focus on the behavior and results you have control over and create solutions.

What can you learn from last year to make this year better?

“Keep looking up! I learn from the past, dream about the future and look up. There’s nothing like a beautiful sunset to end a healthy day.” – Rachel Boston

How to Make the Most of 2015 By Doing a Year-End-Review


Joe Wilner

Joe Wilner is a life coach, licensed clinical psychotherapist (LCP), and drummer from the band Yes You Are. He is also creator of You Have a Calling, a blog and online community helping people discover and pursue their life’s work and mission. Through deep and personalized coaching, he helps ambitious, creative, and spiritually minded individuals make a greater impact, grow as leaders, and design a soulful life they are inspired by.


No comments yet... View Comments / Leave a Comment

 

 

APA Reference
Wilner, J. (2015). How to Make the Most of 2015 By Doing a Year-End-Review. Psych Central. Retrieved on June 3, 2020, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/best-self/2015/01/how-to-make-the-most-of-2015-by-doing-a-year-end-review/

 

Last updated: 1 Jan 2015
Statement of review: Psych Central does not review the content that appears in our blog network (blogs.psychcentral.com) prior to publication. All opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the author alone, and do not reflect the views of the editorial staff or management of Psych Central. Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.