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Crying During Therapy


Meeting new people is hard for those of us with anxiety disorder. We believe they are going to judge us, that we are not going to live up to whatever fantastical idea we have created in our heads that they will expect of us.

One thought on “Crying During Therapy

  • July 26, 2017 at 11:35 am

    A friend of mine once told me I have “the gift of tears.” She’d had a hard upbringing that had taught her to suppress her tears, to the point that she couldn’t even cry when she wanted to. I, on the other hand, am a highly empathetic crier. (I rate good romance novels by how many tissues are piled up next to me at the end of the book.) My friend said that watching *me* cry when she talked about her past helped to bring her release. And in turn, she helped me accept my tears for the gift they are– not always a *convenient* gift, I’ll admit, but a gift.

    I think we really don’t give tears their due in our society. We cry furtively; we try to pass it off as allergies or “something in my eye.” We’re quick to label women “hormonal” or men “weak” for crying, but it can take a lot of bravery to publicly own your emotions and cry openly in front of others. You may feel embarrassed for expressing emotion so openly, but it’s a LOT healthier than bottling it up. (And hey, it’s scientifically proven that crying really DOES make you feel better– there was even a Psych Central article a few years back on all the ways in which tears are therapeutic: https://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2011/05/29/7-good-reasons-to-cry-the-healing-property-of-tears/ .)

    If you’re crying in therapy, I’d take it as a good sign. It means you trust your therapist enough to cry in front of him or her, and it means you’re getting the things that upset you most deeply out into the open, where you can work on them. Go ahead and let it out– those tears will help you heal.

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