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7 Things Those Of Us Living With Bipolar Disorder Can Do Now

Ah, the good old virus. The nation is shutting down, much like the rest of the word. Here are a few things you can do to cheer up during  this time of uncertainty.

Dance Party – I love to dance. It does not have to be choreographed. It can be a wiggle in the shower (my favorite place to get down). Kitchens are a usual place to dance when we are frying up some dinner or our morning eggs and bacon, right? Once upon a time, years ago when mania came to visit far more often, I climbed up on the coffee table and danced while my puppy, Hope, watched me like I was crazy. (Guess what?) Dancing reminds me of my twenties and having a great time out with my friends at clubs, which in turn reminds me of  my favorite bands or songs on the radio.

Music lovers – I had a therapist tell me that music has the same effect on your brain as cocaine. Now, I have NEVER tried cocaine or any other drug that is not prescribed, but I have seen how the media makes it look and it looks. She told me to listen to music first thing in the morning and nothing that is sad or melancholy, but something to make me happy and energized. I have made an “Inspirational” Spotify playlist. When I need a little boost or encouragement, I have a little listen. Sing if you want or dance, whatever, just enjoy yourself.

Whip up something – I love to bake, I pretty much suck cooking. I have three books instructions on how to make cupcakes. I have tried a few, but there are so many I’d like to make. I haven’t even got any flour. My brother bought me some essentials. He bought me to nonstick pans and a collection of frosting tips. My point is – try making something with the stuff you have on hand. Try cooking a new recipe for dinner. Have an adventure in your kitchen.

Pet your pets – Sometimes in the haste of life, our pets get to be an after thought. Good thing we don not have to distance ourselves from our furry friends (or feathered or scaled). Take some time for a game of fetch. Take a nap with your cat on the couch in the sun. Watch your fish, it is supposed to lower your blood pressure.

Letters make sentences make paragraphs make books – finally some time to read! You’ve got books from BookBub virtually piling up and you have been waiting to find time to read. Well, dear reader, we are not going anywhere any time soon. It is also a good time to take the time to choose some podcasts to listen to. That is my problem, I never listen and choose something I would want to continue to listen to often. Viola! Time!

Warm up the plasma – Get hooked on a Netflix show, do not worry, you have plenty of time to start one an!d, maybe, even finish whatever it is your watching. I know, not everyone has Netflix, but you likely have some form of visual stimulation. Catch up on your show on your DVR or On Demand. Rent a film from Redbox, which are everywhere. (Also if you sign up for Redbox texts they often send out deals.)

Enjoy the sunshine – I live in the South so we barely had a winter. Do not worry, I have lived through blizzards. Back to my point, get some natural vitamin D. I have blogged before on how good the sun is for depression and moods. I am only asking you to get a little bit, even if you have to wear a coat.

So, in conclusion, try to think positively on this time you have been given out of the workplace.

7 Things Those Of Us Living With Bipolar Disorder Can Do Now


Elaina J. Martin


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APA Reference
Martin, E. (2020). 7 Things Those Of Us Living With Bipolar Disorder Can Do Now. Psych Central. Retrieved on April 3, 2020, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/being-bipolar/2020/03/26/7-things-those-of-us-living-with-bipolar-disorder-can-do-now/

 

Last updated: 26 Mar 2020
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