advertisement
Home » Blogs » Being Beautifully Bipolar » How My Brain Reacts To Lack Of Medication

How My Brain Reacts To Lack Of Medication

Something strange happens midday when I forget, or let too much time pass, to take the meds when I am supposed to take them. I begin to have a very hard time thinking. I am very inarticulate. I get very confused; lost almost.

Does this happen to anyone else?

The medications I take midday are for my anxiety.  So is it my anxiety manifesting in a form of confusion? And I hate it becuase at least with friends and family they are aware it can happen. They can guide me and help me out, but when I am with strangers it is embarrassing. For example, when I go to Starbucks I tend to get one of two drinks, but it is as though I am being presented with too many options when I am in this affliction – I stammer, I stutter, I apologize for taking so long; I say that I am tired, that I am hungry. Not that I am, it is just that I am mentally ill and forgot to take my meds like a big girl.

It really makes things worse. I already have a very bad case of memory fog (which I have written about before and will again soon for those of you that missed it). Appearing like an idiot is not something I adore. I have always prided my intellect. That is why when I was diagnosed with a mental illness and my “my brain failed me,” I was pissed.

But I know much more now and know that my brain never failed me. It just works differently.

 

How My Brain Reacts To Lack Of Medication


Elaina J. Martin


2 comments: View Comments / Leave a Comment

 

 

APA Reference
Martin, E. (2017). How My Brain Reacts To Lack Of Medication. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 17, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/being-bipolar/2017/07/01/how-my-brain-reacts-to-lack-of-medication/

 

Last updated: 8 Jul 2017
Statement of review: Psych Central does not review the content that appears in our blog network (blogs.psychcentral.com) prior to publication. All opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the author alone, and do not reflect the views of the editorial staff or management of Psych Central. Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.