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When You Are The “Crazy” One

There was a time when I was normal. I remember it. I think it was high school, that would explain all the dreams I have of high school classmates. I hadn’t yet felt the true darkness of depression, though it whispered in the wind. And mania, well, I didn’t even know what that word meant.

I was a cheerleader, the JROTC commanding officer – maybe I was too busy to bother with noticing I was getting sick. College was much the same, president of this and that club, working 20 hours a week on top of schoolwork. I had depressive episodes but mania had yet to really show itself.

It was after college that I began to show signs of my illness. It was a late onset of bipolar disorder 1, usually it reveals itself in a person’s early twenties for me it was mid-to-late twenties.

So, I became the “crazy” member among the family. They say bipolar disorder runs in families, but no one has come forward to tell me that great Uncle Bubba suffered like I do. (Names have been changed 🙂 ). I am the first. I hope to be the last.

It doesn’t always feel good living with bipolar disorder – though, at moments, mania can be an indescribable high. I have made great friends who live with mental illness. So, there is that, and each and every day, they fight a battle against their mind – the one that tells them they are better off dead than to live in this world that doesn’t understand them.

 

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When You Are The “Crazy” One

Elaina J. Martin


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APA Reference
Martin, E. (2017). When You Are The “Crazy” One. Psych Central. Retrieved on May 27, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/being-bipolar/2017/02/07/when-you-are-the-crazy-one/

 

Last updated: 12 Feb 2017
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