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It Isn’t Always Easy To Be Beautifully Bipolar

frustrated manHaving bipolar disorder isn’t always beautiful. Going through this med change I have been particularly irritable. Last week I was physically incapable of doing everyday tasks. I’ve been snappy with my boyfriend. Cursing to no one. Just not the lovable Elaina J that I usually am.

I remember before my illness stabilized, I had fits of rage. I would yell, I would throw things (not at anyone). I even managed to crack my windshield with a hurling cell phone – not one of my proudest achievements.

People who are not well-versed in mental illness do not know that bipolar disorder symptoms are more than feeling elated or feeling sad. There are many other common symptoms – irritability, anger, numbness, hallucinations, sleep problems- the list goes on.

It isn’t cool to take out your emotions on other individuals. Sure, it happens and sometimes it makes a big mess of relationships, but take responsibility for your actions. Apologize. Work with your therapist, support group, or others to learn tools to help you manage all these symptoms that come along with being beautifully bipolar.

I just wanted you to know you aren’t the only one out there hurling cell phones or sleeping the day away. It happens to the best of us.

 

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It Isn’t Always Easy To Be Beautifully Bipolar


Elaina J. Martin


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APA Reference
Martin, E. (2015). It Isn’t Always Easy To Be Beautifully Bipolar. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 23, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/being-bipolar/2015/12/16/it-isnt-always-easy-to-be-beautifully-bipolar/

 

Last updated: 16 Dec 2015
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