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Depression and Eating 

depression eating

There is a relationship between depression and eating. If you suffer from, or have suffered from a bout of depression, you know what I am talking about.

For me this time, it is the lack of desire to eat, the inability to make a decision on what to eat, and simply not wanting, nor having, the energy to fix something. I believe this may happen because your other feelings outweigh your desire to eat. You are so fully consumed by the darkness that there is no room for appetite.

On the other hand, sometimes when people, myself included, get depressed we try to fill that gaping hole we feel inside with food. Personally, when I have the kind of depression that demands food, it is pretty much carbs that I want – and the “bad” foods: Ben & Jerry’s Phish Food, McDonald’s French fries, bags of potato chips – you get the picture. But the thing is, food won’t fill that hole. It will just make you gain weight and that will make you feel worse.

The best thing you can do when you are depressed is stick to a set eating schedule. Eat something for breakfast. Eat something for lunch. Eat something for dinner. Have a snack. Go out to eat with a friend. Try to stick to healthy foods, I promise they will make you feel better.

 

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Depression and Eating 


Elaina J. Martin


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APA Reference
Martin, E. (2015). Depression and Eating . Psych Central. Retrieved on August 20, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/being-bipolar/2015/04/09/depression-and-eating/

 

Last updated: 9 Apr 2015
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