advertisement
Home » Blogs » All Things in Mind » Feed Your Relationship Every Day of the Year

Feed Your Relationship Every Day of the Year

Feed Your Relationship Every Day of the YeareOne day when counseling a friend about his relationship, I used a medical “pearl of wisdom” that we physicians use to heal bodies, and I applied it to his attempts to work out his relationship. I then realized that many of these medical pearls also serve as excellent words of wisdom and guidance to promote healthier interpersonal relationships.

For Valentine’s Day, people scramble, trying to find something to express their love to their honey. For some, this special day is the only day of the year when an effort is made to give a gift, a card, say sweet nothings (that really mean a lot), or have a special evening together.

With that in mind, I encourage you to “Assure Adequate Nutrition,” not only on Valentine’s Day, but every day of the year.

One of the most important duties of a doctor is the assessment, correction and upkeep of adequate nutrition for patients. Proteins, minerals, water, sugars and more are the building blocks of every cell in the human body. Without these building blocks, cells suffer, strength is reduced, wounds don’t heal, and organs wither and die. In short, without ongoing and proper nutrition, life dissipates.

Adequate “nutrition” is also vital to sustain and promote the life of your relationship. Too often people stop feeding their relationship with the building blocks they used to first bring life to that relationship–love, laughter, fun, prayer, understanding, time together, communication.

These are just some of the necessary nutrients you must give your relationship on a regular basis (not only on Valentine’s Day). When you withdraw these, for whatever reason–too busy with the kids, work, or other responsibilities pulling on your time–your relationship will suffer: The frequency of joyful moments is reduced, communication falters, any painful situations won’t heal and the relationships themselves may wither…and perhaps even die.

Don’t make your loving relationship a victim of “failure to thrive.” Valentine’s Day comes but once a year, but you want your love to last each day and forever. Feed it regularly with the emotional, supportive and vital nutrients it needs to be healthy, viable and vibrant for years to come.

“Assure Adequate Nutrition” is one of dozens of “medical pearls of wisdom” found in the E-Book, First Do No Harm: How to Heal Your Relationships Using the Wisdom of Professional Caregivers. Other “pearls include ‘Men Feel Pain, Too.’ ‘Never Underestimate How Much Someone Hurts’ and more.

Feed Your Relationship Every Day of the Year


Melody T. McCloud, MD

Dr. Melody T. McCloud is a trailblazing obstetrician/gynecologist, author, public speaker and media contributor. She has received many awards including the "Health-Care Heroes ‘Physician’ Award” per the Atlanta Business Chronicle, and is also recognized as one of the “25 Most Influential Doctors in Atlanta." Dr. McCloud has been interviewed on CNN, Headline News, network affiliates, TBN, the Tom Joyner Morning Show; and her writings or comments have been printed in USA Today, Parade, Essence, Family Circle, Health, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and more. She hosts a health blog at Psychology Today and, upon invitation, speaks nationwide to many organizations. She is a member of the Atlanta Press Club and many leadership organizations.


No comments yet... View Comments / Leave a Comment

 

 

APA Reference
McCloud, M. (2015). Feed Your Relationship Every Day of the Year. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 20, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/all-things/2014/02/feed-your-relationship-every-day-of-the-year/

 

Last updated: 9 Feb 2015
Statement of review: Psych Central does not review the content that appears in our blog network (blogs.psychcentral.com) prior to publication. All opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the author alone, and do not reflect the views of the editorial staff or management of Psych Central. Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.