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Sense of Humor, Social Networking, and Sanity!

Photo from Flickr, Country_Boy_Shane

I am not sure if those three words can be put in the same sentence. If anything triggers my ADHD, it is social networking. And then it leads me to question my sanity. At which time I look hard and find my sense of humor and get back down to earth and back to it.

I’m going to tell you about an amazing tool for social networking. Well, it is kind of amazing. It is still in testing but could make our lives a whole lot easier!

ADHD or no ADHD, if you have anything to do with social networking, know anything about it, or ever use it (which obviously you do because you are reading this blog), you may be able to relate. I happen to have a company and a nonprofit — for which I am both responsible for all of the ‘social’ networking (we are changing the definition of networking — it used to mean actually meeting people live and talking!).

Now, if there was just Blogger. Or WordPress. Maybe I would be ok. But there is Twitter, Facebook Fan Pages, Facebook Groups, Facebook Pages, MySpace, Reddit, Digg, Delicious, Brightkite, Bebo, Dribble, Ember, Friendfeed, Flickr, Evernote, Dopplr, Cargo, Newsvine, LinkedIn, Pandora, Picasa, Plurk, Orkut, Gowalla … YOU GET THE IDEA!

Seriously — who is doing this to us?! Anyway, tests my ADHD to the limits.

So I got really excited when I read about Posterous — a place where you could post ONE thing and it went to all of your sites (of course, you have to set them all up, remembering the passwords that you have stored in your Where is the Milk stuff, etc.).  Hooray! I’m loving this new application.

So since this social networking thing is taking up all my time / ability to be social, I invest the time to set-up Posterous for both accounts, linking Blogger, Twitter, MySpace, blah blah blah and post via e-mail (yeah, isn’t that cool?!). You know what happens?

It keeps posting. And posting. The e-mail is caught in some terrible cycle. So now on my Mood-factory social networking sites I have about 100 of the same post — on each site!

Photo from Flickr, Netzanette

This is where the sense of humor comes in (I swear if I had a cat, this is what they would be doing to me). You can react any way you want — anger, sadness, frustration … and I know I had all of those. My normal reaction would be to work the wee hours of the morning until I cleaned it all up, calling the company (again and again), complaining, annoyed, needing it perfect, etc. etc. Instead, I turned off the computer and watched Michael get saved on American Idol.

And this morning I hiked and thought about the situation and laughed, and laughed, and laughed some more. In the whole scheme of things, the most important thing is that I am alive. Breathing. Healthy. And sometimes, when all else fails, laughter really is the best medicine for keeping your sanity.

xoxo

ps.  I would still highly recommend Posterous. We are getting it straightened out. It is free. And they have been extraordinarily helpful in helping to fix the problem.

Sense of Humor, Social Networking, and Sanity!


Kathryn Goetzke

I own a company called the Mood-factory (www.mood-factory.com), a company that creates products based on how sensory experiences effect moods. I also run a nonprofit for depressio, iFred (www.ifred.org), we are working to change the brand of depression. And yes, I have ADHD, along with PTSD, major depressive disorder, and a host of other challenges, opportunities, and gifts.


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APA Reference
Goetzke, K. (2010). Sense of Humor, Social Networking, and Sanity!. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 8, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/adhd/2010/04/sense-of-humor-social-networking-and-sanity/

 

Last updated: 8 Apr 2010
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