6 thoughts on “5 Debunked Causes Of ADHD We Can Now Laugh At

  • April 12, 2013 at 10:16 am

    Please, stop naming ADHD a disorder – it’s not. We’re all different beings – and ADD/ADHD is simply a ‘different mode of being’.

    Reply
    • April 12, 2013 at 2:09 pm

      Sorry, Rhea, that wasn’t me, I didn’t name it a disorder.
      I just follow the guidelines. I’m the first to agree that a negative spin on this is a negative, but I think what we have to stop doing is suggesting that the word disorder is a negative. We have a difference in the way our brains work. If one considers the majority of minds to be in order, then ours are in disorder. We benefit in some ways from that and are penalized in other ways.

      So yes, you are right in saying ADHD is a different way of being, but it is still a disorder.

      Thank you for your opinion and for bringing your very positive attitude to this forum, please feel free to offer your perspective at any time,
      Kelly

      Reply
  • April 12, 2013 at 10:12 pm

    The one I’ve heard is too much sugar, tying closely into the myth that sugar can cause hyperactivity. Another I’ve heard is that it’s caused by wimpy parents who are afraid to use physical punishments to whip their children into shape. I think I can safely say that both parents and children are happier knowing that neither of these myths are based in fact.

    Reply
    • April 12, 2013 at 11:45 pm

      Hey, The Nerd, thanks for your views.

      And thanks for reading my blog,
      Kelly

      Reply
  • April 17, 2013 at 2:32 pm

    Thank you for your blog Kelly. As a parent of a child with ADHD, I have vivid memories of my parents blaming my son’s behavior on my parenting. I can also recall the pediatrician recommending that I stop all sugar in his diet.

    It is now years later, and I am an ADHD Family Coach who has worked with hundreds of parents and children over the years. I think your statements are correct; none of the five items you highlight are causative. However, all can exacerbate ADHD symptoms. Keep up your good work.

    Reply
    • April 18, 2013 at 5:06 pm

      Thanks so much, Judith Champion. I agree that it is important to keep clear on what is and isn’t causal, especially when assessing the ever changing lists of so called cures and treatments available.

      Thanks for reading my blog and sharing your views,
      Kelly

      Reply
 

Join the Conversation!

We invite you to share your thoughts and tell us what you think in this public forum. Before posting, please read our blog moderation guidelines. A first name or pseudonym is required and will be displayed with your comment. Your email address is also required, but will be kept private. (Please note that we use gravatars here, which are tied to your email address.) A website/blog/twitter address is optional.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *