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The ADHD Emergency Kit


ADHD Emergency Kit
Things I might need

Go get a box. No, wait, you’ll put it somewhere and forget where that was.

Oh hell, you need the box, go get a box. We’ll worry about where it is later.

Now, get an old envelope and a pen and get ready to make a list of what you need to gather to put in the box.

If there’s ever an emergency, you’re going to need things that others don’t need.

In fact …

You’re going to have emergencies others won’t have. Here’s what you need to do.

Every time something happens that brings you down and reminds you about how your ADHD frags your life, write it down.

Then write down what you think might have helped you make the problem less of a problem.

Then?

Make an effort to include that thing in the box as soon as you can.

Remember that the box can be any size, and if it’s too small you can get a bigger one later.

Also remember where you put the box. We discussed that before, right?

Some obvious ones

There are some obvious things you should maybe have in that box. A spare set of keys to absolutely everything might be the top one.

A small book of passwords and user names would not be a bad idea to have too. When you lose a device it’s nice to be able to have the info you need to make another device work for you. Additionally, some of the passwords might be related to recovery apps.

Add to that book the combinations for any combo locks you might forget. Isn’t it funny how we can unlock a combo lock a hundred times and then one day when we try to think what the combination is it’s just gone?

Other people …

People without ADHD have emergency kits that include water and matches or a lighter or both, documents, a utility knife, a first aid kit. That’s a good idea. As a human, with or without ADHD you may or may not have one of those but I can tell you you should have one.

But we have our own challenges that are of an emergent nature, and so a second emergency kit is also a good idea.

What do you need to keep going?

Are you one of the people who needs a fidget spinner? Get a spare one for the box. Do you need to have coffee in the house? Throw an extra pound into that box.

Have you forgotten to take your meds once or twice? Grab an empty pill bottle and put those extras away for a day when you forgot to refill your script.

Now

Put the box somewhere that you’ll remember it.

And augment your memory with positive reinforcement.

You do that by thinking, each time you put something in it, how great it will be to have the thing you just put away when you need it.

And feel good about yourself for doing this for you. You deserve to have this kind of care. You’re okay.

The ADHD Emergency Kit


Kelly Babcock

I was born in the city of Toronto in 1959, but moved when I was in my fourth year of life. I was raised and educated in a rural setting, growing up in a manner I like to refer to as free range. I live on the traditional lands of the Chippewas of Nawash in an area where my family history stretches back 6 or 7 generations and my First Nations friend's families go back hundreds of generations. I was diagnosed with ADHD at the age of 50 and have been both struggling with the new reality and using my discoveries to make my life better. I am a freelance writer and I write two blogs here at Psych Central, one about living with ADHD and one that is a daily positive affirmation that acts as an example of finding the good in as much of my life as I possibly can.

Find out more about me on my website: writeofway.

email me at ADHD Man


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APA Reference
Babcock, K. (2020). The ADHD Emergency Kit. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 25, 2020, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/adhd-man/2020/01/the-adhd-emergency-kit/

 

Last updated: 31 Jan 2020
Statement of review: Psych Central does not review the content that appears in our blog network (blogs.psychcentral.com) prior to publication. All opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the author alone, and do not reflect the views of the editorial staff or management of Psych Central. Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.