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Hey, got a minute?

fist through glass
Mildly upsetting

Did you just cringe when you read that title?

I mean, yeah, you were cruising the web, you got north of ten tabs open on your browser, you knew you were already down the rabbit hole when those words popped up. But still, did you get that feeling of the beginnings of anger?

Just the words caused that. Right?

Not even the situation.

But

The words reminded you of the situation that angers us.

We’re browsing the web, or we’re watching TV, or maybe reading a book. Or we’ve torn something apart in order to repair it. Or we’ve started to create something, a painting, a craft, a work of fiction, a Popsicle stick replica of the Space Needle or the CN Tower. Or we were just drifting off in our mind to a place where we could contemplate some kind of solution to some problem.

Then someone said, “Hey, got a minute?” or, “What’cha doin’?” or maybe, “I need your help for a minute.”

ARRRRGGGGH!

And then the torrent of feelings, the strongest one being anger at being interrupted.

The others are a mixed bag, embarrassment at being angry is definitely one of those others. But fear at losing your place in your train of thought is a big part of the mix.

There’s also a good chunk of confusion if you were hyper-focused on the thing you were engaged in.

It’s like …

It’s very much like (and I know some of you won’t get this, bear with me, I’m old) being in a darkened movie theatre and being immersed in the story line of a movie when suddenly …. the film breaks. There you were, in the jungle, trying to get to the river and being chased by who knows what evil group of entities that are bent on your destruction and you’re almost there when something else steps into your path and you stop, you’re sweating, scared, and you suddenly see a possible solution.

You’re about to dive for it and then, BAM! There’s a weird noise behind you of a mechanical nature, the slapping of an end piece of a Mylar strip of film as it goes around a reel, and a brilliant bright white wall in front of you, blinding you where a moment ago there were moving images.

Now, it shouldn’t be that dramatic, And yet it is. Let me say this just once, it is such a cliche in our ADHD world, but it is a cliche because it is a truth.

“We Do Not Transition Well”

And we can be trying to get our taxes done, or we can be attempting to balance a spoon on the rim of a coffee cup, we might be working on solving the riddle of cold fusion or contemplating words that rhyme with “auto dictation.”

The internal reaction will be the same. We will be upset!

In sixty years I’ve managed to get my reaction under control.

Understand that I have not stopped it from happening, but I have managed to check my outward manifestations of that reaction to an extent where I’m comfortable with my behavior.

But those words still bother me.

Hey, got a minute?


Kelly Babcock

I was born in the city of Toronto in 1959, but moved when I was in my fourth year of life. I was raised and educated in a rural setting, growing up in a manner I like to refer to as free range. I live in an area where my family history stretches back 6 or more generations. I was diagnosed with ADHD at the age of 50 and have been both struggling with the new reality and using my discoveries to make my life better. I write two blogs here at Psych Central, one about having ADHD and one that is a daily positive affirmation that acts as an example of finding the good in as much of my life as I possibly can.

Find out more about me on my website: writeofway.

email me at ADHD Man


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APA Reference
Babcock, K. (2019). Hey, got a minute?. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 23, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/adhd-man/2019/09/hey-got-a-minute/

 

Last updated: 3 Sep 2019
Statement of review: Psych Central does not review the content that appears in our blog network (blogs.psychcentral.com) prior to publication. All opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the author alone, and do not reflect the views of the editorial staff or management of Psych Central. Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.