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Am I wrong?

I'm not wrong!
… am I?

I’ve made some observations through the course of my life. And for the most part they seem to hold true.

I’ve made these observations from watching people. I have ADHD, and watching other people is a constant source of entertainment … and confusion for me.

And I’m going to share one with you.

Firstly

These are my observations.

They may be wrong, but they’re mine, and as such, I am entitled to them.

What I’ve observed …

I’ve observed that the first thing out of someones mouth when they make an unsolicited declaration … is usually a lie.

The number of times I’ve heard the words, “I’m not easily offended, but …” and then had to listen to how they are, in fact, quite easily offended after all.

They will follow that declaration by telling of some trivial thing that should have been taken as a joke.

Perhaps it’s the word “I”?

“I am not generally an unreasonable person …”

“I don’t usually intervene but …”

But not always …

“It’s not usually my habit to judge …”

Well … that’s really just a different grammatical construct of “I don’t usually …” so maybe it is always “I”

And dammit …

For the life of me I cannot think of an adequate comeback. And that is unusual, I have ADHD, usually I can come up with something inappropriate to say.

You see, although this sounds like it should be a lie, I’m going to just say … I don’t usually find myself at a loss for words, whether they are relevant or pertinent, or not.

I feel like I should just look them in the eye and say, “Yes you are.” but of course by the time they’re done talking, that original declaration of their self assessment made to justify their next (and likely most unwelcome) judgement has long been forgotten, lost as the focus of the conversation, and requiring me to direct attention back to it in order to comment on it …

And that makes anything I say, clever or otherwise, come out sounding lame.

Maybe?

Maybe I’m judgemental myself. Maybe? No, no maybe about it.

But I own it. And yes, maybe I shouldn’t speak out.

And in truth I often don’t. I often bite my tongue, figuratively of course, I only literally bite my tongue when I’m eating too quickly because I want to say something to someone before I forget.

Yes, sometimes …

Sometimes I will interrupt someone to tell them that they’re wrong when they say they aren’t easily offended.

And you know what, they’re usually quite offended by that, proof that they were not being truthful, just as I had said.

I don’t usually care …

People comment on my posts and sometimes they are offended by what I say, but mostly they are commenting to tell me they agree.

And when they comment that they disagree with me I really, truly don’t take offense.

So feel free to tell me that I’m wrong, but I don’t think I am.

Am I wrong?


Kelly Babcock

I was born in the city of Toronto in 1959, but moved when I was in my fourth year of life. I was raised and educated in a rural setting, growing up in a manner I like to refer to as free range. I live in an area where my family history stretches back 6 or more generations. I was diagnosed with ADHD at the age of 50 and have been both struggling with the new reality and using my discoveries to make my life better. I write two blogs here at Psych Central, one about having ADHD and one that is a daily positive affirmation that acts as an example of finding the good in as much of my life as I possibly can.

Find out more about me on my website: writeofway.

email me at ADHD Man


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APA Reference
Babcock, K. (2019). Am I wrong?. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 10, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/adhd-man/2019/07/am-i-wrong/

 

Last updated: 3 Jul 2019
Statement of review: Psych Central does not review the content that appears in our blog network (blogs.psychcentral.com) prior to publication. All opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the author alone, and do not reflect the views of the editorial staff or management of Psych Central. Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.