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Just Calm Down

No DON
Help end Delusions Of Normalcy

So, the old “lessons” people used to try to teach us … are still around.

“Just focus.” “You can do this, it’s just a form to fill out. Look, everyone else has theirs done.” “Take it easy.” “Just calm down.”

I personally love when those lessons occur. In fact, I like to use them as learning moments, opportunities to make things better in my life.

Really? How?

How? By educating the people who clearly still don’t get what ADHD is and how their being able to spot what I can’t do doesn’t make them any kind of expert that has anything to offer me in the way of help.

And that’s not always easy, because the people who don’t have ADHD often suffer from a nasty thing I like to call Delusions Of Normalcy, DON for short.

And what are the symptoms of DON?

There are many, an unwarranted sense of self assurance is one of them. They don’t believe in vaccines. They don’t believe in Autism. They don’t believe in ADHD. They know the best diets, routes, books, movies, etc. They are happy to tell you what you should do, eat,wear, drink, feel, and more. They believe that they have figured everything out and they are prepared to tell you their logic. They often park where they shouldn’t. And they usually think street signs don’t apply to them.

And they can justify everything in their lives and in the lives of everyone else as being someone else’s fault.

And how do I teach them?

Okay, you got me there. I don’t. I just usually explode at them, list all the reasons they’re wrong, and explain what they’re missing in their “big picture” of how to fix me.

And then I usually have to listen to them say, “Calm down!” Yeah, like you had nothing to do with making me upset.

And the final blow?

Often the last thing that happens before I close up and shut down, is my suffering the indignity of hearing them proclaim that my not understanding them is because of my belief in ADHD.

And that’s when I realize they’re the victims. They’ve got it. DON!

Can it be cured?

I don’t know. I can tell you that there is less research being done on Delusions Of Normalcy than on ADHD. I can tell you that people with it don’t believe it exists. I can tell you that it does sometimes occur concurrently with ADHD, which makes diagnosis of ADHD difficult.

I can also tell you that it does sometimes spontaneously mediate.

Is there proof of that?

Yes, dear reader, there is proof of that, for I am living proof.

I indeed used to suffer from DON, Delusions Of Normalcy. And now I am fully aware that I am not normal, and fully cognizant of the fact that being not normal is a good and wonderful thing.

So you see, even though there is no cure for ADHD as yet, there is hope for those who don’t believe in it.

Just Calm Down


Kelly Babcock

I was born in the city of Toronto in 1959, but moved when I was in my fourth year of life. I was raised and educated in a rural setting, growing up in a manner I like to refer to as free range. I live in an area where my family history stretches back 6 or more generations. I was diagnosed with ADHD at the age of 50 and have been both struggling with the new reality and using my discoveries to make my life better. I write two blogs here at Psych Central, one about having ADHD and one that is a daily positive affirmation that acts as an example of finding the good in as much of my life as I possibly can.

Find out more about me on my website: writeofway.

email me at ADHD Man


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APA Reference
Babcock, K. (2017). Just Calm Down. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 20, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/adhd-man/2017/09/just-calm-down/

 

Last updated: 8 Sep 2017
Statement of review: Psych Central does not review the content that appears in our blog network (blogs.psychcentral.com) prior to publication. All opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the author alone, and do not reflect the views of the editorial staff or management of Psych Central. Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.