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The Scariest ADHD Things You Will Ever Hear … Or Say

Heard any good ones lately?
Heard any good ones lately?

ADHD is not necessarily a good place to be. It’s not the Ritz, not easy street, not a walk in the park.

And yet, for the most part, if you have it, it’s where you’re most at home. Like me, if you have ADHD, you’ve lived here all your life.

It’s kind of like living on the so called “wrong” side of town. It’s not really all that unsafe, so long as you know where to walk, what to do, who to steer clear of. You know, the little things … all those things we’re not all that good at remembering to do.

And the strangest part of it is that here on the ADHD side of town, the scariest things you might hear, are things you’ll likely hear from yourself.

Example number one

Here’s our first example, “That’s so brilliant, I’d never forget it. I don’t need to write that down.”

When you hear yourself saying this, you need to write down whatever thought or idea you had that preceded it. Unfortunately, if you’re anything like me, it’s already too late. As soon as I realize that I’ve uttered that scary statement, I try to remember what the idea was. Although often it’s too late, sometimes … sometimes I can get it back.

Example number two

Possibly even scarier than “write this down,” is the horror of “I’m going to keep this in a safe place. And, I know the perfect place for it.”

How many things have disappeared into that ADHD limbo known as “A safe place?” How many treasures are gone to that hellish vortex between reality and fantasy, never to be seen again. HOW MANY??? … I don’t know, I’ve lost count. But it’s a lot.

Example number three

Although less scary on the surface than the first two, number three is the second worst one on this list. Why? Precisely because it does seem less scary than others. But once you’ve uttered it and followed through on the mechanics of it, you suddenly recognize that you’ve gone some place you swore you wouldn’t go again. It is this: “I wonder what would happen if I did this completely differently from the way it’s been done for so many years?”

Sometimes you make a mess. Sometimes things get broken. Sometimes damage is done that will never be completely undone. And the feeling you get when that happens is … well, it’s one that ADHD has already made you familiar with.

Example number four

This is the worst one. The all time scariest thing that you’ll ever hear yourself say. And even as you’re saying it, somewhere in a small corner of your mind, you’ll already be regretting it. The scariest thing that you’ll ever say is …

“Hey everybody, watch this.”

The Scariest ADHD Things You Will Ever Hear … Or Say


Kelly Babcock

I was born in the city of Toronto in 1959, but moved when I was in my fourth year of life. I was raised and educated in a rural setting, growing up in a manner I like to refer to as free range. I live in an area where my family history stretches back 6 or more generations. I was diagnosed with ADHD at the age of 50 and have been both struggling with the new reality and using my discoveries to make my life better. I write two blogs here at Psych Central, one about having ADHD and one that is a daily positive affirmation that acts as an example of finding the good in as much of my life as I possibly can.

Find out more about me on my website: writeofway.

email me at ADHD Man


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APA Reference
Babcock, K. (2015). The Scariest ADHD Things You Will Ever Hear … Or Say. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 15, 2019, from https://blogs.psychcentral.com/adhd-man/2015/01/the-scariest-adhd-things-you-will-ever-hear-or-say/

 

Last updated: 27 Jan 2015
Statement of review: Psych Central does not review the content that appears in our blog network (blogs.psychcentral.com) prior to publication. All opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the author alone, and do not reflect the views of the editorial staff or management of Psych Central. Published on PsychCentral.com. All rights reserved.