Archives for Psychotherapy

Mental Health

10 Tips for Finding a Great Therapist

Making the choice to begin counseling can be difficult; finding a therapist that you connect with and can help you is challenging.
Google will gladly overwhelm you with thousands of counselors or therapists in less than a second.
Therapy sites such as or Psychology Today offer search tools for specific cities and states.
As a therapist, I've had people find me through my blog, a friend, newspaper articles or a TV appearance, and...
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General

3 Steps to Battle Self-Hatred


Dear Reader,

If I were to sneak inside your head, just for a moment, what would I hear?

At your darkest moment, when you’re all alone with your thoughts and your thoughts are the things of chaos, when you can’t sleep, and you are at your lowest, what words would slip into being?

Is your head full of hate to yourself? Do you chastise and berate your actions of the day? Do you hear anger? Chastisement? Disgust?

If I could magically give...
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Family

When Your Teen is Being Bullied: 5 Things Parents Need to Know

No parent wants to find out that their child is being bullied. Yet this is a situation in which many parents find themselves, and it can be incredibly scary and confusing.

Teens are bullied over the same thing generation after generation: physical differences such as weight, acne and facial features, speech differences, mental abilities/disabilities.

Teens get bullied verbally, physically (tripping down the hall, book bumping), and through writing.

One significant difference that teens face now is the vast...
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Family

Making the Most of Marriage/Relationship Counseling

People seek marriage or relationship therapy for many reasons.

For some people, it's because of a crisis, such as infidelity, job loss, illness or accidents.

Others come in because they feel distant and want to grow closer, or they seek counseling before they marry to sort out any difficulties and ensure that they're ready for life together.

Some couples simply know that something feels wrong but they don't know what, and they want to fix it.

But once you and your partner have decided to seek counseling, how do you make the most of it? Here are six things to consider.
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Abuse

The Newest Face of Trauma: Female Veterans


"Jessica" (pseudonym) was 18 years old when she enlisted in the Army. She was trained as a mechanic, and enjoyed what she did.

The Army provided her the family she didn't have at home and a sense of belonging and stability. At the time, the United States was not engaged in a war. A year later, this would change.

Jessica was sent to Afghanistan. While there, she was injured when the truck she was driving hit an IED. After her body healed, and she continued in her unit. Like all service people who serve in a war, Jessica saw and experienced many horrific things.

After her time in Afghanistan ended and she was back in the US, Jessica's body wasn't the same. She had an undiagnosed TBI (traumatic brain injury) from the IED. She had intense mood swings. She couldn't concentrate. She had nightmares nearly every night.

These were all problems that Jessica felt like she could talk about with other veterans, friends and family. Things like TBI and PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder) have become well known and understood.

What Jessica didn't feel like she could talk about was the rape by her commanding officer, the very person in the chain of command she was expected to report sexual assault to, and who she looked up to like a father.
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Depression

Surviving S.A.D (Seasonal Affective Disorder)

It's fall here in the United States. For much of the country, this means darker skies, shorter days, and colder temperatures. For many people, the change in season can also mean an increase in depressive symptoms.

What is Seasonal Affective Disorder (aka SAD)?

SAD is a type of depression that occurs during a change in season, usually fall and winter. People who suffer from SAD have many of the same symptoms as those with depression: lack...
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Abuse

Sometimes it’s the Little Things that Hurt the Most

Have you ever had a moment when things are going relatively smoothly, then something small happens and your whole world is turned upside down?

Often we think that big problems come from big incidents: your spouse divorces you and you become depressed, your house burns down and you have nightmares for weeks, you fight in a war and have PTSD.

But trauma doesn't fit so neatly into a box.

Some people experience severe trauma with very few lasting side-effects; others go through what many would consider a minor trauma and it has a significant, life-changing impact. So what's going on?
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Psychotherapy

Making the Most of Your Therapy

Psychotherapy can be a beneficial part of many people's lives.

Working with a therapist can promote growth and healing, as well as decrease symptoms such as anxiety and depression.

Therapy is also an investment. People spend money, time and energy hoping to make themselves and their relationships healthier and happier.

Each person comes in to therapy with different hopes and expectations, as well as different problems and concerns. Just as every person and therapist is unique, every therapy experience is one of a kind.

Although there is no way to guarantee the exact road that your therapy will take,  there are some things that you can do to make the most of your therapy.
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General

Embrace Your Creativity

Creativity. It's a word that adults either love or run away from, claim for themselves or deny the very existence of.

Creativity is a characteristic prized in children. Did you ever create forts with sheets and a kitchen table, or play cops and robbers, house, or act out a TV show? Creativity is fun!

Children use their creativity to open up their minds, to learn and to enjoy themselves. Creativity is as basic and natural as breathing, and as useful as intellect.

Children create constantly, both with their hands and with their minds. They can look at a paperclip and imagine hundreds of uses, see dragons in the clouds, or invent invisible cars that fly.

But as people get older, the push for creativity diminishes. Creativity is often relegated to drawing, making music, or writing. People who don't consider themselves artistic may falsely believe that they are not creative.

But creativity is much more than art. It is a part of nearly everything we do. And the more the creative brain is used, the stronger it becomes.
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