Shake a littleAs diligent caregivers and Partners in Wellness, we need up-to-the minute, precise information which can impact our job for better or worse. Wrong information can cause wrong decision making, leading to disaster. We need truth!

Who can you count on for truth? Some, due to past experience, may have trust issues. Personally, I don’t believe everything in print or online. It may sound good on the surface, but if you dig a little deeper and do research, good sometimes changes to bad…as in “bad” information or harmful if believed and acted upon.

So, that puts responsibility on me to be selective and smart about source. This causes me to take some things with a grain of salt. Don’t get me wrong, I do like salt. Too much is dangerous to your health.

Actually, some new research suggests that too much salt can be hard on your brain. An overly-processed diet with lots of sodium can be harmful in various ways to the body, including cognitive decline. Is my brain/mind diet consisting of consuming overly processed/high sodium information?!  What impact is this poor diet of misinformation having on me (and society) and those in my care?! Good food for thought. Maybe we shouldn’t be so quick to pass the salt…(spread speculative information around.)

Timing can be everything. A critical piece of “accurate” information just in the nick of time can save a life. Kenneth Cole Reaction watch
Say if I’m about to cross the street and someone shouts: “look out, there’s a car that ran a stop sign speeding straight for you!” Will I stop or cross the street?

It depends on the person doing the shouting. Have they cried wolf to me before? Do I look both ways? Do I see the car? Do I hear the car?

What would you do? Don’t get hit by a car. Don’t cry wolf. Look before you leap!

Yes, sometimes we all take a leap of faith. But, faith should be based on facts and not credulity. Well, that’s what I base mine on — facts! It takes time, patience and perseverance to gather the facts.

Do you have all the facts? How will facts help you do better as caregiver, parent, friend, worker, partner, teacher? Facts, like numbers, don’t lie.

As Caregivers and partners, we must build trust. How does one do that? We cannot just talk the talk. We must walk the walk. A simple yet profound biblical verse to live by: “Let Your Yes mean Yes and Your No, No.” Consistency is required to build trust. Our words must consistently match our actions in order for others to trust us or to listen to us. (As a mother of four, that’s parenting 101.) As a Caregiver and partner, does your yes mean yes? Does your no really mean no?

Okay, what does this all have to do with Hurricane Isaac making landfall in Louisiana? Good question. I’m thinking of the answer as I type this. It’s coming to me (I’m tired, my brain needs boosting and I am out of gum, ugh!)

Hey, it’s your prerogative to take this blog with a grain of salt. Do your own research. Be sure to pass the pepper, please. I need a good sneeze to clear my head. ACHOO!

Accurate, precise, trustworthy information is important in times of emergency!! If people don’t trust information coming from “officials” or take warnings seriously, they may decide to have a hurricane party instead of “parti” (French for leaving) or evacuating to safety!!

IMG_1597 signed

Hurricanes spawn Tornadoes…Do You Have A Tornado Plan?

 Is your home prepared for a tornado? Pick a place you can go:

  • Basement.
  • Center Hallway.
  • Interior bathroom without windows on lowest floor.
  • Interior closet on lowest floor without windows.
  • Keep these areas uncluttered.
  • If not possible, protect yourself and loved ones by getting under heavy furniture or using a mattress to shield your bodies is the next best thing. Don’t go near any windows!

“At 8 a.m. EDT (1200 GMT), Isaac was about 50 miles (75 km) south-southwest of New Orleans and packing top sustained winds of 80 miles (130 km) an hour, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said.”

“It said hurricane force winds extended outward up to 60 miles (95 km) from the storm’s center.”

Here is a highlight from an online article By Duane D. Stanford and Esmé E. Deprez on August 28, 2012, in Bloomberg Businessweek:

“Hurricane Isaac came ashore in southeast Louisiana’s swamps about 6:45 p.m. local time, bringing with it gale winds and a powerful storm surge.” “On Aug. 29, 2005 — almost seven years to the day –Hurricane Katrina flooded 80 percent of New Orleans after levees protecting the city failed.” “Isaac’s rain may fall for 24 to 36 hours, and storm surges of up to 10 feet could cause flooding even after the storm has passed, Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal said at a news conference today in Baton Rouge.”

Ed Rappaport  from the National Hurricane Center said:  “Storm surge is the most dangerous and can kill the most people.” “90% of lives lost during a hurricane is due to drowning.”

Hoping all those hunkering down from Hurricane Isaac are safe, warm and well!! What are you hunkering down from? Be Safe, Be Warm, Be Well!

There you have it. Hopefully this blog is informative and helpful on some level to you. THANKS for reading!! Remember, check the facts and don’t eat too much salt; you’ll live longer!
Trees
Creative Commons License photo  photo credit: ksablan : Ðariusz : Marcelo J. Albuquerque : scotbot

 


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From Psych Central's website:
PsychCentral (August 29, 2012)

From Psych Central's website:
PsychCentral (August 29, 2012)

Rick Stevens (August 29, 2012)

Keiko Marutani (August 29, 2012)

GOKU Media (August 29, 2012)






    Last reviewed: 29 Aug 2012

APA Reference
Winifred, J. (2012). Isaac Makes Landfall in Louisiana: Why The Facts Are Important. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 2, 2014, from http://blogs.psychcentral.com/wellness/2012/08/isaac-makes-landfall-in-louisiana/

 

 

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