When your partner goes on medication for depression, they will likely be prescribed one of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors--or SSRIs, for short. Those include citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Prozac Weekly, Sarafem), paroxetine (Paxil, Paxil CR, Pexeva), sertraline (Zoloft), and fluoxetine combined with the atypical antipsychotic olanzapine (Symbyax). These drugs are popular because they work to block the reabsorption of serotonin in the brain, which allows chemical messages to be sent and received better in the brain. As a result, your partner's mood is improved.

That's the good news.

The bad news: SSRIs come with side effects, like any drug might. But one of the biggest complaints people have about taking SSRIs is a change in sexual functioning. Common issues include reduced sexual desire, inability to maintain an erection, inability to orgasm, and numb genitals. These particular side effects are so common, approximately half of the people taking SSRIs experience them.

What do you do if this is the case for your partner?

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