Paying Attention to Our Bodies

By Margarita Tartakovsky, MS

Author Tina Welling had no idea that she had an underactive thyroid. She was experiencing all the symptoms, such as weakness and frequent infections. She was canceling meetings and outings with friends. Her work schedule was getting tougher and tougher to keep up with.

But she hadn’t noticed any of this — until a blood test showed her levels were off the charts. She’d become numb to her own body.



Self-Care Sunday 10.5.14

By Margarita Tartakovsky, MS

soup in CT, 2011

In addition to sharing links to others’ posts on self-care (along with a few of my own) in these “Self-Care Sunday” posts, I’ll also occasionally share a small tip or idea for taking kinder care of ourselves.

Yesterday, I was reading one of my favorite blogs “Eat This Poem.” It’s written by Nicole Gulotta, who I actually interviewed last year about her creative process. In her latest post, Nicole shares this beautiful quote from Laurie Colwin’s book of essays Home Cooking: A Writer in the Kitchen:



When You Need Stillness

By Margarita Tartakovsky, MS

connecticut park

Lately, my mind has felt very crowded. There are so many thoughts bumping up against each other in my brain.

You have sooooo much to do. Did you call this person? Pay that bill? Run that errand? You have to revise your book! And think of topics for this month’s articles. You have sooooo much to do. Is it time for grocery shopping? Did you bring that coupon? Nope! Forgot it like you always do. You need to budget better. You have to revise your book! Did you take out the laundry? You need to sweep and wash the floors. The bathroom is not looking good. Why aren’t you writing on your personal blog? You’re soooo behind on email. Did you call that person? Pay that bill? Run that errand? You have to revise your book!



Connecting to Our Core Selves

By Margarita Tartakovsky, MS

NYC, early July 2014, cropped, deep blue sea

In her piece on the power of story and the quest for our true selves, Justine Musk includes this poem by David Whyte (the last few lines are my favorite):

This is not
the age of information.
This is not
the age of information.
Forget the news,
and the radio,
and the blurred screen.
This is the time
of loaves
and fishes.
People are hungry
and one good word is bread
for a thousand.



Self-Care Sunday 9.28.14

By Margarita Tartakovsky, MS

st. augustine sky

This is a new series on Weightless that includes all kinds of posts, which explore taking kinder care of ourselves — from appreciating our bodies to getting to know ourselves better to feeling our feelings to saying no to saying yes to savoring supportive, healthy relationships.

Because self-care helps us build a more positive body image. Because self-care helps us build fulfilling, satisfying lives. Because self-care simply feels good!

I hope you find these links inspiring and empowering.

How to overcome limiting beliefs.

5 ways to know and honor your rhythms.



What to Remember When You Feel Terrible About Your Body

By Margarita Tartakovsky, MS

sneakers shot

I think it’s key to feel our feelings — whatever the feeling that comes up. All feelings are valid. So if you’re feeling like crap about your body, then you’re feeling like crap about your body.

That’s OK.

It’s something to acknowledge, accept and feel — instead of beating yourself up for beating yourself up.

But sometimes these feelings and thoughts stick around too long. And they start dictating our decisions to not take kind care of ourselves (which only boosts our negative body image). They become overwhelming. All-consuming. Stressful.



On Self-Doubt And Small Steps

By Margarita Tartakovsky, MS

colored pencils

Rachel Eddins, one of my favorite experts to interview for Psych Central, shared a powerful story for a piece I’m writing on self-doubt:

For years her client believed she was unworthy, which held her back in many areas of her life. It was a story created for her by someone else. It was a story that followed her for her most recent predicament: She needed to find a new job.

When she and Rachel started exploring what she’d really like to do, her self-doubt started roaring — I can’t do that! and she felt stuck.



Forgiving Ourselves

By Margarita Tartakovsky, MS

creative joy, purple flowers

This weekend I took out my journal and wrote a kind of letter to myself. I started with these words: I forgive myself…

I wrote down the things I am ready to forgive myself for (and a few things I am not). Maybe you, too, want to focus on forgiveness, and write about what you’re ready to let go.



The Opportunity in Every Moment

By Margarita Tartakovsky, MS

updated pic of heart blooms, may 2013, in CT

My whole life I’ve leaned toward all-or-nothing thinking. Black or white. Binge or restrict. Terrible day or terrific.

In my mind I was either the energizer bunny or a sloth. I was either beautiful or blah. And how could I be beautiful if I was only pretty sometimes?

If I ate too much, I’d think F that, my diet is ruined! and pile on the extra helpings. I didn’t ask myself if I really wanted more, if I genuinely wanted to enjoy extra bites. No. Instead, I was focused on the fact that tomorrow I’d need to be perfect. 

Tomorrow would be the day. The day I’d follow that diet flawlessly. And then in a week, a few weeks, when I lost some weight, I could finally start taking better care of myself. I could show my face at the gym. I could finally appreciate my body. I could feel better about myself.



On Judging Ourselves And Feeling Painful Emotions

By Margarita Tartakovsky, MS

permission granted, circle

I think one reason we have an unhealthy relationship with food and ourselves — eating ’til we’re uncomfortably stuffed, restricting ourselves, hurling insults, not practicing compassionate self-care — is because of judgment.

Specifically, we judge ourselves for all sorts of things. We judge our appearance. We judge our mistakes. We cling to shoulds that fuel self-judgment and keep us stuck.

I should weigh less. I should wear a size 4. I should eat less. I should never eat dessert or pizza or pasta. I should be able to do this with zero help.



 
 

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Recent Comments
  • productive1: In my own case, I feel that there are many critical voices or inner critics within me. I do not try to...
  • Margarita Tartakovsky, MS: @ Anna, my pleasure! :) xoxo
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