Archives for Weight

Body Image

Love Yourself Anyway

Some of us grew up in abusive households, where we were torn down every single day. Where we were explicitly told that we are unworthy and unlovable.

Some of us grew up in healthier households, but were bullied in school for our weight, looks or who we are.

Some of us grew up in households where weight was synonymous with self-worth, where certain foods were forbidden and insults about appearance were the norm.

Some of us have had toxic relationships with people who berated us for everything. And, over time, we started to believe them.

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Body Image

A Powerful Body Image Book for Kids

Today, I’m excited and honored to share my interview with Judith Matz and Elizabeth Patch, creators of the powerful kids book Amanda's Big Dream. It tells the story of a girl who dreams of a solo in the Spring Ice Skating Show. But her confidence plummets when her skating coach makes a comment about her weight.

I’ve known Judith and Elizabeth for several years now, and have featured their important work here on Weightless. Elizabeth is a high school art teacher and illustrator who creates beautiful images that reflect a diversity of body types. As she says on her website: "Happy art for every body!"

Judith is a licensed clinical social worker who's been helping people overcome overeating and build a healthy relationship with food and themselves for over 25 years. She's also the author of The Diet Survivor's Handbook: 60 Lessons in Eating, Acceptance and Self-Care and Beyond a Shadow of a Diet: The Comprehensive Guide to Treating Binge Eating Disorder, Compulsive Eating, and Emotional Overeating.

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Body Image

Self-Care Sunday: Your Voice

When we dislike our bodies, when we feel uncomfortable in our own skin, we may start silencing our voices.

Because we haven't lost weight, can't adhere to a diet, can't fit into a certain size or don't fit into a certain standard, we become convinced that our voices don't matter. That we haven't earned the right to speak, to matter.

We dismiss our thoughts and opinions. We dismiss our needs. We neglect our feelings.

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Body Image

What If You Still Don’t Like Your Body?

I subscribe to Anna Guest-Jelley's newsletter (and you should, too; it's filled with excellent and practical insights). Recently, she wrote something really powerful, which I knew, as soon as I read the words, that I had to share with you.

It's a beautiful way of thinking about body acceptance. And it's something I think so many of us forget. I forget.

Because body acceptance can feel tough. It can feel unnatural. But even though it feels uncomfortable, or awkward, or itchy or really hard, that doesn't mean we're doomed to hate our bodies or to feel disconnected from them.

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Body Image

Practicing Self-Compassion When You Can’t

I recently wrote this article on how to practice self-compassion when it's the last thing you want to do. Because when we're upset, so many of us revert back to what we know: berating ourselves.

We might do this in the moment. For days. Maybe even weeks.

We might do this after bathing suit shopping. After not running as fast or walking as long as someone else, or ourselves the time before. After an awkward interaction with our boss. After making a mistake. After doing, saying or experiencing anything we deem inadequate.

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Body Image

A Valentine’s Day Gift for Your Body

So often, as we sprint through the day, the last thing we think about is our body.

The last thing we think about is the inner machinery that's involved in the seemingly simplest of movements: opening our eyes in the morning; glancing about the room, hitting the snooze button (a few times); shifting our feet from the bed to the floor; walking (or running) into the bathroom; splashing water onto our faces; picking up a toothbrush; turning on the faucet for a hot shower.

In those few minutes, our bodies perform great feats.

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Body Image

When You Think Your Body Is to Blame

Many of us leap into conclusions when it comes to our bodies. For instance, we assume that if a piece of clothing doesn't fit us, it's clearly our fault. It must be because we're too curvy, our shoulders are too broad, our thighs are too big, our waist is too wide.
We do this with other things, activities and even people. Some of us play this blame game regularly. In the excellent book Yoga and Body Image, co-editor Anna Guest-Jelley shares the different ways she blamed her body.
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