Archives for Psychotherapy

Communication

The Turkey Prince: A Story About Healing The Soul


The Turkey Prince by Rebbe Nachman of Breslov

Once upon a time, the king's son lost touch with reality. He thought he was a turkey. He longed to sit naked under the table snacking on breadcrumbs--so he took off all his clothes and sat under the table, pecking at the floor.

The king summoned the royal doctors--they all tried different medications, therapies, and cures. But none of them could help the prince and they worriedly quit trying.

The king was devastated.

Then, a wise man came. "I can cure the prince," he said.
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anxiety

Should Docs Give Psychiatric Meds To Babies?

The news is startling. The New York Times reports:

Almost 20,000 prescriptions for risperidone (commonly known as Risperdal), quetiapine (Seroquel) and other antipsychotic medications were written in 2014 for children 2 and younger, a 50 percent jump from 13,000 just one year before, according to the prescription data company IMS Health. Prescriptions for the antidepressant fluoxetine (Prozac) rose 23 percent in one year, to about 83,000.

Through adolescence, our brains and bodies change in ways science has only just begun to understand. But infants' brains and nervous systems change so rapidly that development can be measured not in years or months, but in weeks. How can we know with any certainty that anti-psychotic medications aren't negatively altering infants' and children's development in dramatic ways?

We can't.

So, why are some doctors prescribing anti-psychotic medications to babies?
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Communication

Can An Angry Teacher Teach You About Anger?

An Angry Teacher?

Who are your mentors, teachers, role models? Whom do you admire? Respect? Learn from?

Can they control their anger?

Imagine: You're sitting in a college classroom, taking a course on the philosophy of relationships. Your professor, a tenured, well-respected man, gives a brilliant lecture on the nobility of friendship. He speaks about forbearance, equanimity, tolerance and seeing the good in others.

You have a question about the assignment, but
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Addiction

Use Joy To Treat Depression, Anxiety, Addiction

To find joy is the hardest thing of all. It is harder than all other spiritual tasks…Put all your energy into being happy. — Rebbe Nachman of Breslov

People struggling with depression, anxiety, and other mental illnesses benefit from making joy a part of their mental health treatment plan.

Joy's Power

Joy's Dark Opposites: Joy is the opposite of nearly every draining emotion and feeling: Despair. Anger. Depression. Jealousy. Hate. You can't merely implant joy on top of negative emotions and feelings, but you can engage in joyful activities which are important to the healing process.
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General

Do You Have To Tell Your Therapist In Person That You’re Leaving?

Dedicated, skilled, and caring therapists will, together with you, discuss the right time to end therapy. Usually they'll discuss it with you in the first few sessions so you can be prepared for about how long therapy might take. They'll share with you possible treatment time-frames, and together you'll decide how to proceed.

Your therapist and you will schedule regular progress check-ins, every few sessions or even once per session, and assess how effective the therapy is for you. If it isn't after a reasonable period of time, a responsive therapist will try other approaches with you or might even suggest a different therapist.

But suppose that you decide your therapist isn't for you and you are planning to leave therapy, either to work with someone else or because you feel you no longer need therapy—what should your course of action be?
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Communication

Do You Really Need To Talk About Your Past?

Does therapy absolutely require you to "talk about your past?" Do you need to "go down that road?"

My answer, adapted from Therapy Revolution: Find Help, Get Better, and Move On, may surprise you.

Your therapist will, beginning from the very first session, evaluate how you cope with problems and challenges. Where your coping skills aren’t as strong as they might be, a good therapist will teach you how to strengthen them. I believe that generally, only then, should your therapist ask your permission to go ahead and explore important events in your past.
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Depression

The Summertime Blahs & Blues

For many of us, summer is the time we feel the most upbeat. For those with SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder), the long days packed with sunshine can offer blessed relief from depression and low energy.

Outdoor walks and other activities and a more relaxed approach to time are things both of us really look forward to and enjoy.

But for some, the summertime is emotionally difficult. The very things that make summer appealing to one person, make it seem negative to another. You can end up with the blahs or even the blues. Here are a few, plus some quick fixes:
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Addiction

Therapists: Could A Medical Condition Be The Cause Of Your Client’s Mental Illness?


A well-trained and dedicated medical doctor will consider whether or not there is an emotional component possibly triggering a physical issue, such as stress in the case of fatigue. But often, those in the mental health field, especially psychotherapists, might not evaluate and rule out medical or other issues in the case of a client presenting with a mental illness.

In training sessions with interns and therapists-in-training, I emphasize the importance of doing a comprehensive evaluation before diagnosing—and doing therapy with—a client. I explain that when it comes to a mental health evaluation it is as vital for therapists to determine which factors are contributing to or causing mental illness, whether that mental illness is mild or more severe.

Yet many therapists jump right into talk therapy at the first or second visit; not everyone in private practice examines medical records or asks their clients to get blood-work done.
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