Archives for Patient Rights

anxiety

Getting Focused On Life, Feelings, Hopes: A Therapy Tool

In recent comments, Lorr, a reader asked to see an example of a personal perspective paper, a therapy tool that can benefit clients who struggle with articulating their experience.

Lorr asks:

I think the PPP is a great idea, I read about it in your book. Do you have a format or samples? I’m not sure how to get started.

How is the PPP different from a biography?

A biography, or autobiography, can tell the events in a person's life, without the inner experience. A PPP is more focused on what these events felt like and how they impacted the person's emotions and his own insights into his challenges.
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Goals and Objectives

5 Essential Ingredients Of Successful Therapy

Successful therapy, that is, therapy that effectively changes how you live your life, must contain five fundamental ingredients:

1. The therapist must be a motivated, experienced professional.

2. The therapist must use evidence-based treatments; that is, proven methods and techniques.

3. Therapy must be carried out in a reasonable treatment time frame.

4. The therapist’s per-hour fee and the entire cost of the course of treatment must be fair and reasonable.

5. The patient must be a motivated patient.

It is important to know
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Communication

The Therapist That Didn’t Show Up For His Sessions

Recently we advised a young woman in her twenties to seek another therapist. We didn't make the suggestion on a whim, this was after consulting with her three times in six months.

Here's why.

Last summer, a friend of a friend (we'll call her Ann), called to ask us for advice regarding her therapist. She and her husband had been seeing him individually, and together in couple's counseling, spending nearly $2000 a month out of pocket. They had been seeing him for just under a year and felt they had seen little to no improvement. Because finances were very tight, they had been cutting back on everything, even basics, like groceries, to pay his fee.

After asking her about what went on in therapy this is what we learned:
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Addiction

Should Your Therapist Poke His/Her Nose Into Your Personal Business?

Good therapists are the ones who have the specialized knowledge to actually give you the key to your own transformation. They also have the sensitivity, training, and ability to work within the parameters of your belief system; not aggressively challenging, nor blindly accepting your conditional outlook, but gently helping you deepen your understanding of your life and your life’s purpose. They help you resolve to improve.

From Therapy Revolution: Find Help, Get Better and Move On Without Wasting Time or Money

Should your therapist "butt in" to your personal life?

Anyone who has ever been in therapy finds this question at once both ludicrous and apt.

How personal should therapy actually be?

There is no easy answer that holds true for everyone. If you are in therapy to work on a certain issue, such as anger, for example, you might be content to gain more awareness of your anger as it occurs in the present, and learn thought-based and behavioral changes to manage it.

Or you might yearn to find the deeper roots of your anger, how it might be related to your deepest fears, and spend a year or more analyzing every nuance of your anger-fear feelings.
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interviews

Therapy For Jewish Children With Special Needs

One of the most important, yet often overlooked aspects of getting therapy is knowing when and how to advocate for yourself or your loved one, a topic we've blogged about many times at Therapy Soup.

Now, just in time for Hanukkah, we interviewed Zlaty Kahan, the founder of JewishConnectEd.com, a Jewish advocacy and education site that helps parents with special- needs children get the therapy their child needs.

What are the issues that affect the religious Jewish population with special needs in contrast to issues that affect other populations?

The process of getting services for a child with special needs is pretty much seamless and straightforward—if your child attends public school. If the parent or teacher think it's necessary, the evaluation takes place in school. Then, the child receives the recommended services. From evaluation to individualized services, everything is done in the school.

However, many Jewish children (especially but not only those from orthodox communities)  attend private religious schools. These parents and kids come from across the entire socio-economic spectrum, and many parents work very hard to give their children education that reflects their beliefs and values. For these families, tax payer funded programs that are available in public schools, including special needs services, are simply non-existent or inadequate. 
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