Archives for Patient Rights

Children

Being Shy Can Be A Good Thing

A little over a decade ago, I was consulted by a young couple regarding their nine-year old son. The school had recommended counseling. They felt his shyness and lack of participation in class was concealing a deeper problem, perhaps abuse, depression, or other issue.

The boy had once participated freely in class, but by mid-year, he never raised his hands and looked like he was daydreaming. The parents took him to a specialist who felt he might be on the autism spectrum and recommended therapy. They wanted another opinion.
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Depression

The Summertime Blahs & Blues

For many of us, summer is the time we feel the most upbeat. For those with SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder), the long days packed with sunshine can offer blessed relief from depression and low energy.

Outdoor walks and other activities and a more relaxed approach to time are things both of us really look forward to and enjoy.

But for some, the summertime is emotionally difficult. The very things that make summer appealing to one person, make it seem negative to another. You can end up with the blahs or even the blues. Here are a few, plus some quick fixes:
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Addiction

Therapists: Could A Medical Condition Be The Cause Of Your Client’s Mental Illness?


A well-trained and dedicated medical doctor will consider whether or not there is an emotional component possibly triggering a physical issue, such as stress in the case of fatigue. But often, those in the mental health field, especially psychotherapists, might not evaluate and rule out medical or other issues in the case of a client presenting with a mental illness.

In training sessions with interns and therapists-in-training, I emphasize the importance of doing a comprehensive evaluation before diagnosing—and doing therapy with—a client. I explain that when it comes to a mental health evaluation it is as vital for therapists to determine which factors are contributing to or causing mental illness, whether that mental illness is mild or more severe.

Yet many therapists jump right into talk therapy at the first or second visit; not everyone in private practice examines medical records or asks their clients to get blood-work done.
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anxiety

Getting Focused On Life, Feelings, Hopes: A Therapy Tool

In recent comments, Lorr, a reader asked to see an example of a personal perspective paper, a therapy tool that can benefit clients who struggle with articulating their experience.

Lorr asks:

I think the PPP is a great idea, I read about it in your book. Do you have a format or samples? I’m not sure how to get started.

How is the PPP different from a biography?

A biography, or autobiography, can tell the events in a person's life, without the inner experience. A PPP is more focused on what these events felt like and how they impacted the person's emotions and his own insights into his challenges.
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Goals and Objectives

5 Essential Ingredients Of Successful Therapy

Successful therapy, that is, therapy that effectively changes how you live your life, must contain five fundamental ingredients:

1. The therapist must be a motivated, experienced professional.

2. The therapist must use evidence-based treatments; that is, proven methods and techniques.

3. Therapy must be carried out in a reasonable treatment time frame.

4. The therapist’s per-hour fee and the entire cost of the course of treatment must be fair and reasonable.

5. The patient must be a motivated patient.

It is important to know
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