Archives for Goals and Objectives - Page 2

Addiction

Should Your Therapist Poke His/Her Nose Into Your Personal Business?

Good therapists are the ones who have the specialized knowledge to actually give you the key to your own transformation. They also have the sensitivity, training, and ability to work within the parameters of your belief system; not aggressively challenging, nor blindly accepting your conditional outlook, but gently helping you deepen your understanding of your life and your life’s purpose. They help you resolve to improve.

From Therapy Revolution: Find Help, Get Better and Move On Without Wasting Time or Money

Should your therapist "butt in" to your personal life?

Anyone who has ever been in therapy finds this question at once both ludicrous and apt.

How personal should therapy actually be?

There is no easy answer that holds true for everyone. If you are in therapy to work on a certain issue, such as anger, for example, you might be content to gain more awareness of your anger as it occurs in the present, and learn thought-based and behavioral changes to manage it.

Or you might yearn to find the deeper roots of your anger, how it might be related to your deepest fears, and spend a year or more analyzing every nuance of your anger-fear feelings.
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anxiety

What Can You Do If You Dislike Being Touched?

Touch enriches our lives.

A  caress from a loved one.

The feeling of a worn cotton tee shirt.

A tickly kiss from a child.

The spring of dough being kneaded.

The soft petal of a rose.

But some people have aversions to one or more types of normally enjoyed or tolerated touch. If you find your aversion to touch interferes with your personal life, relationships, happiness, it's not too late to seek answers.
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Communication

The Silent Treatment And What You Can Do To Stop It Cold

One of the more frustrating passive-aggressive tactics to those on the receiving end is "the silent treatment".

The silent treatment is an abusive method of control, punishment, avoidance, or disempowerment (sometimes these four types overlap, sometimes not) that is a favorite tactic of narcissists, and especially those who have a hard time with impulse control, that is, those with more infantile tendencies.

The silent treatment can be used as an abusive tactic that is the adult narcissist's version of a child's  "holding my breath until you give in and give me what I want."

It is one of the most frustrating tactics
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anxiety

How To Cope With Second-Hand Stress If You Are A Sensitive Empath

Is stress contagious?

You know, those symptoms of stress, such as clenched jaw, highly-pitched voice, furrowed brow, anger, anxiety, and so on.

For some people, other people's stressed-out emotions and moods are simply that: Other People's Stress. OPS. Not theirs.

For others, OPS is absorbed like water to a sponge. And you DON'T have to be co-dependent to be the sponge. You may simply be sensitive.

I'm a strong believer that not every imperfect personality trait requires a diagnosis or a pathology category, and that no one, therapist or not, can truly define the best combination of personality traits. This is highly individual. Most traits have flip sides, and sensitivity—responding to other people's feelings and concerns with empathy—is no exception.
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Children

The Parent-Child Dance: Understanding (And Improving) Your Child’s Problem Behavior

I’m really excited to tell you about The Parent-Child Dance: A Guide to Help You Understand and Shape Your Child’s Behavior, because I know that the author is making a difference in the lives of so many parents and kids. The Parent-Child Dance is written by award-winning pediatric behavioral specialist, Miriam Manela, OTR/L, with the help of me, C.R. Zwolinski from Therapy Soup.

For over a decade, Miriam Manela has been working with children and parents, educators, and therapists, addressing behavioral, emotional, social, learning, physical and other challenges.  During her workshops for professionals, students and educators, Miriam helps the participants understand how to help children regulate themselves and become better able to manage their emotions, connect with others, and learn. She also works closely with pediatric professionals in a variety of professions including mental health therapy professionals, nutritionists, and others.

Richard and I asked Miriam to explain why she wrote The Parent-Child Dance.

Welcome to PsychCentral and Therapy Soup, Miriam. Why did you decide to write the Parent-Child Dance?

Thanks!

I had a client, one of many who had impulsive behavior, a boy I’ll call Terry. Terry would take his brothers’ and sisters’ homework, and crumple it up and rip it, he’d hurt a child on the playground, or he’d a chew his collars and sleeves and rip holes in his clothes. But though he had a hard time controlling his impulses. Terry always regretted his actions later.

He also had a hard time sitting still, especially in the classroom. Both his mom and dad were at their wits’ end. It felt to Terry’s father that he was talking to a wall.
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anxiety

Could A Walking Meditation In The Park Be The Way To Deal With Too Many Problems?

Ebola spreading.

Nukes increasing.

Isis lasting.

Families losing.

Couples splitting.

Children risking.

Depression targeting.

Self-hating.

Self-questioning.

Self.

Self.

Self.

Walking meditation, especially done in a natural setting, whether a city park or a wilderness trail, has the ability to help us gain new insights into problems both personal and global, as well as insights into ourselves.

There are various techniques that can get you started. Here are two:

Numbers Walk
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Communication

I Was Wrong About Online Therapy (With A Caveat Or Two)

Some years ago I was interviewed by a popular science magazine about what I thought of online therapy. At that point, online therapy wasn't exactly new, but it wasn't spreading like wildfire either.

I said that therapy in person could be supplemented by online therapy, but that a therapist can learn a lot about a patient by meeting in person. Body language, dress, and other factors were essential.

At the time I strongly believed that online therapy was a great solution for people who were isolated, whether because of location, disability, or other confounding factors, and couldn't make it to their therapist's office.
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General

Three Universal Questions To Ask Ourselves During Rosh Hashana

This Wednesday night through Friday, Jewish people the world over will observe the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashana, literally translated as the Head of the Year.

The Jewish New Year is quite different from other New Years—though there are festive meals rich with tradition, Rosh Hashana is primarily spent in lengthy prayer, meditation, and self-reflection.

Many people take upon themselves a day or two of limiting or even refraining from trivial conversation, in order to better connect with the spiritual potential inherent in these days.

But whether we limit chatter or not, self-reflection is something every New Year observer is encouraged to engage in. But, self-reflection can feel static unless it involves the process of questioning and answering.
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