Archives for Goals and Objectives


Why Starting Over Is Good For The Soul

If you believe you're essentially like a hippo, starfish, pug, or sheep (or any other animal), then read no further.

If you believe you are a unique, divinely-created soul, and that your soul and body are carefully-chosen mates; if you believe that your life circumstances are designed specifically with you in mind, to help you achieve a purpose or mission in this lifetime; then you probably already know: YOU CAN START OVER.
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Do You Have To Tell Your Therapist In Person That You’re Leaving?

Dedicated, skilled, and caring therapists will, together with you, discuss the right time to end therapy. Usually they'll discuss it with you in the first few sessions so you can be prepared for about how long therapy might take. They'll share with you possible treatment time-frames, and together you'll decide how to proceed.

Your therapist and you will schedule regular progress check-ins, every few sessions or even once per session, and assess how effective the therapy is for you. If it isn't after a reasonable period of time, a responsive therapist will try other approaches with you or might even suggest a different therapist.

But suppose that you decide your therapist isn't for you and you are planning to leave therapy, either to work with someone else or because you feel you no longer need therapy—what should your course of action be?
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Goals and Objectives

7 Emotional Insights Borrowed From The Jewish New Year

The observance of Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year begins next Sunday night. Although it is a Jewish holiday, we are also celebrating the anniversary of the Creation of the first human being, Adam.

We believe that Rosh Hashana has universal relevance and messages for all humankind.

Beginnings are important, essential even. How we spend the New Year influences our entire year. Here are just a few important emotional insights from Rosh Hashana.
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Do You Really Need To Talk About Your Past?

Does therapy absolutely require you to "talk about your past?" Do you need to "go down that road?"

My answer, adapted from Therapy Revolution: Find Help, Get Better, and Move On, may surprise you.

Your therapist will, beginning from the very first session, evaluate how you cope with problems and challenges. Where your coping skills aren’t as strong as they might be, a good therapist will teach you how to strengthen them. I believe that generally, only then, should your therapist ask your permission to go ahead and explore important events in your past.
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Just as some medical doctors aren’t in tune with the importance of recommending psychotherapeutic evaluations, some psychotherapists aren’t aware of the importance of recommending medical evaluations.

Sadly, I would say this is often the case. Illnesses that should be treated medically can sometimes masquerade as emotional problems.

For example, a condition such as mitral- valve prolapse (a common disorder where the valve between the heart's heart’s left upper chamber and the left lower chamber doesn't doesn’t close properly) can cause symptoms of anxiety, including heart palpitations.
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The Summertime Blahs & Blues

For many of us, summer is the time we feel the most upbeat. For those with SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder), the long days packed with sunshine can offer blessed relief from depression and low energy.

Outdoor walks and other activities and a more relaxed approach to time are things both of us really look forward to and enjoy.

But for some, the summertime is emotionally difficult. The very things that make summer appealing to one person, make it seem negative to another. You can end up with the blahs or even the blues. Here are a few, plus some quick fixes:
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Why Bucket Lists Are Kind Of Depressing

C.R. writes:

A recent Mayo Clinic study on happiness concluded that happiness is a learned trait, something to be cultivated. The Mayo Clinic also reports that most if not all happy people exhibit these five behaviors/traits:
1.Devoting time to family and friends
2.Appreciating what they have
3.Maintaining an optimistic outlook
4.Feeling a sense of purpose
5.Living in the moment
For some people, number 6. is Having a "bucket list."

The concept of a bucket list is based on a movie (I didn't know this until I researched its origins) about two terminally men who create a list of things they want to do before they "kick the bucket".

My Introduction to Bucket Lists

I remember exactly how and when I became familiar with the term. A few years ago a friend of mine told me that she really wanted to visit Morocco. It was, she said, at the top of her "bucket list." I asked her what a bucket list was, and she said a bunch of things people want to do before they die. Her bucket list included mainly adventures in foreign lands and a few glamorous activities (something to do with celebrities, five star hotels, perhaps.)

I found this stunning.
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