Archives for anxiety


Use Joy To Treat Depression, Anxiety, Addiction

To find joy is the hardest thing of all. It is harder than all other spiritual tasks…Put all your energy into being happy. — Rebbe Nachman of Breslov

People struggling with depression, anxiety, and other mental illnesses benefit from making joy a part of their mental health treatment plan.

Joy's Power

Joy's Dark Opposites: Joy is the opposite of nearly every draining emotion and feeling: Despair. Anger. Depression. Jealousy. Hate. You can't merely implant joy on top of negative emotions and feelings, but you can engage in joyful activities which are important to the healing process.
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Enlightenment–Thinking About Attachment

Enlightenment: the action or state of attaining or having attained spiritual knowledge or insight, so says the dictionary.

Non-Attachment Enlightenment

The concept of enlightenment today sometimes reflects the view that an awareness which frees a person from the cycle of rebirth, enlightenment is largely about non-attachment.

Attachment is prison, meditation and nothingness are the key to enlightenment.

Non-attachment is the highest state of being and total enlightenment.

Letting go is the way to go.

Practice enlightened mindfulness, not attachment.

And the famous:...
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The Deeper Meaning Of Blame Vs. Punishment In The Brain

C. R. writes: A recent study from Vanderbilt University seems to show that blame and punishment are decided by two different parts of the brain:
Juries in criminal cases typically decide if someone is guilty, then a judge determines a suitable level of punishment. New research confirms that these two separate assessments of guilt and punishment -- though related -- are calculated in different parts of the brain. In fact, researchers have found that they can disrupt and change one decision without affecting the other.
—Vanderbilt University. "How your brain decides blame and punishment, and how it can be changed." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 September 2015.
This is both fascinating and timely!

Ten Important Days
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Can The Effects Of Trauma Be Passed Down Generation To Generation?

Trauma Can Change Us

There is no doubt trauma changes us. When I (C.R.) was beginning graduate studies, my main focus was on what I call "legacy trauma."

Personal interviews and experience has shown me that the children of those who are not spiritually and emotionally healed from traumatic experiences seem to be likely to pass down a legacy of trauma through the generations. This legacy affects every aspect of their children's and grandchildren's lives, from how they respond to positive or negative "news" to how they show their love for each other.

I've seen this primarily with families of Holocaust survivors and this was to be my main research, but certainly other traumatic, national and personal events (my focus was on national, ethnic, etc.), from war in places like Sudan and Syria, to the Japanese earthquakes, to the Ring of Fire Tsunami, appears to leave survivors with a broad range of reactions, ranging from feelings of helplessness to developing suddenly acquired but abiding belief in God.

But are there actual physiological changes that lead to a genetic legacy?
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Just as some medical doctors aren’t in tune with the importance of recommending psychotherapeutic evaluations, some psychotherapists aren’t aware of the importance of recommending medical evaluations.

Sadly, I would say this is often the case. Illnesses that should be treated medically can sometimes masquerade as emotional problems.

For example, a condition such as mitral- valve prolapse (a common disorder where the valve between the heart's heart’s left upper chamber and the left lower chamber doesn't doesn’t close properly) can cause symptoms of anxiety, including heart palpitations.
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