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Another Spin on the Marriage-Go-Round: New Data on Americans Who Marry Over and Over Again

You don't need to be an American to know that Americans just love marriage. Matrimania – the over-the-top hyping of marriage, coupling, and weddings – is pervasive. But the evidence for our special relationship with marriage is not just in the popularity of shows like The Bachelor or the tedious regularity with which TV shows, movies, and novels end at the altar. It is also in the hard numbers – Census Bureau data on the frequency with which Americans get married, and then get married again, and then get married still again.

It is a pattern with Americans. Andrew Cherlin told us all about it, by putting together the data that were available to anyone who wanted to take a look, in his aptly-titled book, The Marriage-Go-Round. Americans, he demonstrated, are more into marriage and coupling than people in any other countries in the Western world. Americans marry more, divorce more, and engage in more short-term cohabiting relationships.

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The Real Fairy Tales — Grimmer Than the Grimms’, and Less Sexist, Too!

In different renditions of fairy tales, there is a hierarchy of realness. The Disney versions are chirpier than the dark versions published by the Grimms. But even the Grimms' editions have been cleaned up relative to more authentic renderings.

Unknown to contemporaries until a few years ago is the cache of fairy tales collected by Franz Xaver von Schonwerth in the 19th century. I just learned about them in Laura Miller's interview of the esteemed Harvard folklorist, Maria Tatar, published at Salon.

Miller explains that "Schonwerth considered scholars his natural audience, and as a result the tales he recorded are bawdier, racier and significantly more scatological than the collection the Grimms published under the title 'Children's and Household Tales'." What I found even more intriguing were the many ways in which the Schonwerth tales were less sex-stereotyped and sexist.

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7 Ways to Meet the Locals and Make Friends – in Your Travels and in Everyday Life

I wish I could say that there are many reporters at prestigious publications who routinely write about single people, and do so in enlightened ways. At the moment, there seems to be just one – Stephanie Rosenbloom, a travel writer at the New York Times.

I've mentioned her work here before, in this post and this one. Her most recent article about single people and solo travelers is "A solo traveler's guide to meeting people." It is worth reading the whole thing. Here I'll just give you the listicle version of how to meet the locals and make friends, and skip over the safety tips that are also included in the article.

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115 Years Old, Still Single, and Still Living Alone

"Can staying single really help you live forever?" That was the headline of a story at Fusion, picking up on an article at the New York Times that zipped around the internet soon after it was published – fittingly, on Valentine's Day.

Our heroine is Emma Morano of Italy, born in 1899 and now one of the five oldest people in the world. She has been single since 1938 (so, for 77 years). Times reporter Elisabeth Povoledo said of Morano that she is "convinced that being single for most of her life…has kept her kicking." In Morano's own words, "I didn't want to be dominated by anyone."

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Patricia Arquette, Jon Stewart, and the No Good, Very Bad Week for Women Who Are Single or Have No Kids

To be single or an adult with no kids is to be in a group that is often stereotyped, stigmatized, or ignored. Those derogated and marginalized categories are different from other stigmatized categories, such as certain racial groups, because there is far less awareness of the prejudice and discrimination. That means that there is also less effort put into the avoidance of boorish behavior toward people in those groups. And it means that sometimes even people who consider themselves open-minded and anything but bigoted in fact behave badly – without even realizing it.

In just the past few days, there have been two high-profile examples. The first has already gotten so much attention that there is a backlash to the backlash. I'm talking about Patricia Arquette's acceptance speech at the 2015 Oscars when she won the award for Best Supporting Actress for her role in Boyhood. Here's the key part:

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Do Fretful Discussions about Living Alone Drive You Mad?

It has been quite the week for angst about living alone. On the latest episode of Grey's Anatomy, aptly titled, "The bed's too big without you," the high-powered, ultra-talented female doctors were hanging around waiting for their printer to produce body parts when they launched into a discussion of how hard they found it not to have someone else in their bed. One after another, they moaned and decried the sadness of living alone, until, at last, the youngest of the group admitted that she loved having her bed to herself.

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Check Your Marital Privilege

[This article is co-authored – in alphabetical order – by Lisa Arnold, Rachel Buddeberg, Christina Campbell, and Bella DePaulo. We are cross-posting it on all of our blogs.]

"White privilege" and "male privilege" are familiar concepts in our cultural conversations. There is, however, another vast swath of unearned privileges that have gone largely unrecognized, even though they unfairly advantage about half of the adult population in the United States. We're talking about marital privileges. People who marry enjoy social, cultural, economic, and political advantages that single people do not, simply because they are married.

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The Worst — and Best — of Valentine’s Day

It is that time of year when my inbox fills up with emails from people asking for favors. They want me to promote their products about dating and mating, and assume that because my blog and my books have "single" in the title, of course I would be interested in doing so. They've never read any of my work, nor that of any other person writing about single people in a way that is not saturated with singlism.

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