myths about single people Articles

Are Married People Really Outnumbered? Does It Matter?

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

shutterstock_208650805Recently, Bloomberg News declared that for the first time, more than half of American adults are single – they are either divorced or widowed or they have always been single. In numbers, that amounts to 124.6 million people; in percentages, it is 50.2 percent. The report inspired an outpouring of “what does it all mean” opinion pieces.

Around the same time, the Census Bureau was releasing its annual “Facts for Features” report to mark Unmarried and Single Americans Week, September 21-27. That report claimed that 105 million people, or 44 percent of all American adults, are single.

So which is it? And does it matter?


Caring about Children and Their Future: Is It a Parent Thing?

Monday, September 29th, 2014

shutterstock_161985149In the lead-up to the Climate Change Summit, a famous actor (I don’t remember who; I’m not good with celebrities) was asked why he was so committed to the cause. He said it was because he had children and he cared about their future.

I’ve heard those kinds of comments repeatedly, and not just around the topic of climate change. With regard to just about any issue that unfolds over time, parents step forward to say that they care about it because of their kids.


Record Number of Americans Will Stay Single for Life

Friday, September 26th, 2014

shutterstock_150476522The most recent report from the Pew Research Center offered a remarkably important, data-based prediction:

“…when today’s young adults reach their mid-40s to mid-50s, a record high share (25%) is likely to have never been married.”

Think about that. There will be a time, in the not-too-distant future, when one out of every four American adults, at age 50, will have been single all their lives! That is a huge number.


To Your Health! 4 Ways Singles Have More to Celebrate

Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014

shutterstock_167694947The third full week in September is Unmarried and Single Americans Week. The Census Bureau has been marking the occasion every year with a special press release rounding up the latest facts and figures. Sadly, most news organizations just ignore the occasion. Those who do give it a nod, such as the Washington Post, mostly just reiterate the key points from the Census Bureau – for example, that 105 million Americans, 18 and older, are single (either divorced or widowed or always-single).

Over at Health.com, though, Amanda MacMillan did something more ambitious: She rounded up 7 empirically-documented ways in which being single affects your health. Here, according to the article, are 4 ways in which singles have more to celebrate, health-wise, than married people do:


Prejudice in the Bedroom: How Many Pillows Does a Single Person Need?

Saturday, September 20th, 2014

shutterstock_204548422Some societies, such as Finland, care deeply that every citizen has a respectable standard of living. A report on what should count as a decent minimum standard of living in Finland begins like this:

“In recent years, the level of basic security has dropped, and the income of those relying on basic benefits has clearly fallen behind that of the rest of the population though they should guarantee all citizens the right to receive essential subsistence and care, even if their income is insufficient for this or the household faces a situation creating a risk, such as unemployment…”

To try to determine what should count as a decent minimum standard of living, studies were conducted with focus groups and other discussion groups. Participants were asked to specify the level of goods that “facilitates a decent minimum standard of living in which physical, psychological, and social basic needs are met and that enables participation in society.”


The Power of Single People: 8 Ways Businesses Are Finally Recognizing It

Wednesday, September 17th, 2014

shutterstock_134465504What is perhaps the best known marketing and communications company, JWT (previously J. Walter Thompson), just published a report about family that would have been unthinkable just a few decades ago.

Among the categories of family in the report were:

  • Kids optional
  • Solo living
  • Pets as family
  • Friends as family
  • Same-sex families

The Best of Single Life

Sunday, September 14th, 2014

single_lifeAs the number of single people continues to grow, now reaching somewhere around half of all adults in the U.S., it is getting harder and harder to insist that all these single people are sad and lonely and bemoaning their status. There are now well over 100 million single people. (I’ll address the question of whether there are really more single people than married ones in the U.S. in a later post.) It is time to stop assuming that they all want to know what they did “wrong” to end up single or how they can be “fixed up,” as if they are somehow broken. Sure, some people would like to be married. But plenty actually love their single lives and intend to remain single. I’ve named this blog, “Single at Heart,” after those people.

Even the single people who eventually want to marry are rarely just wallowing in self-pity about their single status. Increasingly, they want to live their single lives fully and joyfully, and take advantage of every opportunity that single life offers.

So what is it that single life does offer to those open to embracing it?


The State of Singles in the U.S., for a Publication Reporting on Singles Around the World

Wednesday, September 10th, 2014

shutterstock_145434979In the Netherlands, a publication called Individual and Society is about to publish its 100th issue. They have a theme – the state of single people around the world. They have asked people in different countries to write brief overviews of single people in their country, which they will translate into Dutch. They asked me to write about singles in the U.S. Below is the first draft of what I submitted to them.

How Many Adults in the United States Are Not Married?

The number of single people in the United States has been growing for decades. In 1970, only 28 percent of all American adults, 18 and older, were single (divorced, widowed, or always-single). By 2013, that number had increased to 44 percent.

Most single people, 62 percent, have always been single. Another 24 percent are divorced, and the other 14 percent are widowed.

How Do Single (Unmarried) Americans Live?

The vast majority of unmarried Americans are not living with a romantic partner. Of the 105 million Americans 18 and older who were not married in 2013, only 14 million of them were cohabiting.

The popularity of living alone has increased greatly over time. In 1970, 17 percent of all American households were comprised of one person. By 2013, 27 percent of all households were 1-person households; that equates to 34 million Americans living alone.

Of the 105 million unmarried Americans, only 34 million live alone and only 14 million live with a romantic partner. That means that most single Americans live with other people such as friends, family members, roommates, or some combination.

What Is the Political Status of Single People in the United States?

Single people are targets of systematic discrimination in the United States. Just on the federal level, there are more than 1,000 laws affording benefits and protections only to people who are legally married. Many of these are tax benefits. Single people are also disadvantaged in their old-age pensions (Social Security). Single people cannot give their Social Security benefits to anyone else when they die; and, no other person can give their Social Security benefits to …


Single in Poland: Meaningful Work, and Connections to Family and Friends

Saturday, September 6th, 2014

shutterstock_157606439In my previous post, “Why are you single? International edition,” I described what single people in Poland had to say about why they were living single. The research came from Julita Czernecka’s book, Single and the City. In her research, the author interviewed 60 financially stable college graduates between the ages of 27 and 41 who had not been in a serious romantic relationship for at least two years, had never been married and had no children.

Here I want to share more about the lives of single people in Poland, and add some of my own observations about how their experiences seem to compare to those of single people in the U.S.


Why Are You Single? International Edition

Tuesday, September 2nd, 2014

81nBFoHrKTLBy now, you have probably seen far too many of those “why are you single” articles. Way too often, the authors treat singlehood as a disease that needs to be cured, and they tell you what you did wrong that led you to get (or stay) sick. I’ve made fun of those singles-bashing lists and also offered some more positive takes on single life in The Real Reasons for Living Single.

In addition to the disease-mentality, there is something else that is troubling about those articles – they are almost always just the opinions of some outside observer. They rarely ask single people what they think about their single lives.

Happily, that has changed with a new typology offered by the Polish sociologist Julita Czernecka, author of Single and the City. She asked a select group of Polish single people – 30 men and 30 women – to talk about their single lives. The people she interviewed are not a representative sample of Polish singles, so her results are more suggestive than definitive. I think they provide a good alternative, though, to people who offer nothing but their own opinion as to why other people are single.

The 60 singles Czernecka interviewed fit the profile of people she was most interested in learning about. They were financially stable college graduates between the ages of 27 and 41 who had not been in a serious romantic relationship for at least two years. None had ever been married and none had children, but they were all still old enough to have children if they ever wanted to.

Here are the 5 types of single people she found. (She did not say how many were in each category.)

  1. Happy singles: These are single people who “fully accept their lifestyle.” They “do not feel the need to be in a relationship.” In fact, they say that they are happy not to be in a serious romantic relationship. They are probably the people I would call single at heart.
  2. Accustomed singles: They are similar in many ways to the happy singles, but instead of saying …

 
 

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