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General

Two of the Profound Rewards of Staying Single

Do you like your single life? Settle into it. Research suggests that it can be rewarding in ways you rarely hear about. There's a lot of angst these days about the growing numbers of people living single, and especially about young adults who routinely reach the age of 30 without ever having married. By one respectable estimate, one out of every four of today's young adults will reach 50 as a lifelong single person. Many of their parents are freaking out. Some of the young adults who want to marry are also on edge. My hope for all of us is that we get to pursue the life paths we want, whatever they may be. But I think we have an overly anxious and pessimistic view of lifelong singlehood, and I say that based on data. There is not nearly as much research as there should be on single life, and not all of it is as up-to-date as I would like, but there are some telling findings.
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Taiwan’s New President Disparaged for Being Single: Guess What Happened Next

For the first time ever, the President of Taiwan is a woman. The 59-year old Tsai Ing-wen is also single. That did not sit well with a Chinese military official, who believed that her single status rendered her "erratic": "As a single female politician, Tsai Ing-wen does not have the emotional burden of love of 'family' or children, so her political style and strategies are displayed to be more emotional, personal and extreme."
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More Young Adults Are Living with Parents Than Partners, But Another Trend Is Even More Significant

Perhaps you've seen the headlines from the latest Pew Report. For the first time since at least as far back as 1880, more young adults are living with their parents than in any other arrangement. For well over a century, up until now, the most popular way to live among 18- to 34-year olds had been to live with a spouse or partner.

The report highlights data from 1880, 1940,...
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Let’s Talk about Brain Health and Brain Illness Instead of Mental Health and Mental Illness

Getting mental illnesses taken as seriously as physical ones has been a long-lasting struggle. Medical insurance hasn't always covered mental health treatments the way it routinely covers treatments for physical problems. And too often, uninformed laypersons assume that seriously depressed people, for example, should be able to just snap out of it. In part because of the assumption that mental health is under our conscious control in a way that physical health is not, people suffering from mental health problems are more likely to be stigmatized. And that stigma, in turn, can stand in the way of seeking the help that is needed.
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Grief Over the Loss of a Pet Is Finally Getting Acknowledged in the Workplace

Pets have a special place in the lives of so many people. They can be our loving, nonjudgmental, loyal friends, always there for us, always happy to see us. They can even be coolly aloof, and that can have its own charm. Many people feel quite attached to their pets. Even apart from any special bonds, pets can be important in the way they are part of the patterns of our everyday lives.
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Understanding Marital Status Discrimination: From a Congressional Candidate

When constituents write to their political leaders and candidates, what they get back in just about every instance is a form letter. That's not entirely a bad thing, I don't think; if they have a form letter in their back pocket, at least they've thought about the issue and developed a position on it. Every once in a while, though, something amazing happens: a person in politics writes a personal, thoughtful, and informed response – and, cares about the cause you wrote about. That just happened on one of the issues most important to me – marital status discrimination. (The ways in which single people are treated less fairly just because they are single, marital status discrimination, is part of a broader concept I call singlism, the stereotyping, stigmatizing, and discrimination against people who are single.)
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College Love Stories, Reimagined

I went to Vassar College because a friend of my father's, knowing that I had good grades, told him I should apply there. At the time, I had never heard of it. Neither had my dad. I grew up in the tiny town of Dunmore, Pennsylvania, outside of Scranton. Once I realized that Vassar was an elite school, I was a bit embarrassed to have tried for admission. About a month after I applied, my high school guidance counselor asked if I had heard anything back yet. I said I hadn't, and didn't really expect any good news. To which she replied, "Oh, honey, you shouldn't feel that way. In 1933, a girl from this school applied to Smith, and she got in."
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21 Ways Single People Are Taxed More Than Married People on Tax Day and Every Other Day

Americans become especially attuned to fairness in taxation when April 15 rolls around, but for people who are single, every day is tax day. When single people pay more than married people do, either financially or emotionally, they are subsidizing married people.

Here are just some of the ways in which every day is tax day if you are single.

When you are single, every day is the day when you pay more...
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