Archives for Social Anxiety

Anxiety

Migraines: Your Internal Migraine Environment

Chronic migraines are life-changing. It is a lonely struggle that family and friends don't tend to understand without experiencing it for themselves (and migraines are a very individual experience, so even those who have had a migraine don't necessarily know the struggle of another). With chronic migraines, the fear of the next attack always looms. In fact, the fear itself can even become debilitating. People have often relied on medical and alternative practices to try to relieve themselves from chronic migraine attacks. These methods can all be helpful, and it's especially important that people have a neurologist following the progression of their migraines. However, what isn't focused on enough is the role mental health plays in chronic migraines, and how much certain types of therapy can help with relieving migraines.
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Anxiety

Can Talking to Friends Really Replace Therapy?

I have to admit, as a therapist with many years of training, and still aiming to improve my work every day, it always frustrates me when I hear people equate the delicate and challenging nature of psychotherapy with talking to a friend. Sure, therapy can at times involve a venting quality, and this is completely welcome as part of the process. However, this isn't the extent of what therapy is about. Therapy isn't simply an ear and a supportive voice, even if listening and support are part of the picture (and sometimes listening and support is what a person needs; and it's also important to hold in mind that not everybody has an ear or a supportive person in their lives).
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Anxiety

When is it Time to Change Therapists?

Based on my previous post about the usefulness and necessity of anger at one's therapist in the treatment -- rather than abandoning the treatment in these moments -- it was brought to my attention that a follow-up could be helpful to explore when switching therapists may be a good decision. It can't be overstated how complicated of an issue this really is. What makes changing therapists so complicated is understanding the greater picture of what's triggering the urge to leave. Is it something the therapist is specifically doing? Is a pattern being re-enacted by the client -- with the therapist --that happens in their own lives outside therapy as well (a very common phenomenon that can actually enhance the treatment)? Is it a dynamic that's triggering past emotional states that could actually be useful to understand in the treatment? Is the client wanting to leave the therapist for actually not being a good therapist, or is it more about the difficulty of facing the negative emotions within an overall good treatment? And so on. Basically, how does a person determine when the therapist is problematic, versus when the difficult emotions of an otherwise positive treatment are triggering a desire to leave?
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Divorce

Angry at Your Therapist?…This Doesn’t Mean “Bad Therapy”

This topic can take an entire book to talk about, so this post alone will probably not do it justice. When people think of therapy, many people think that "good therapy" means that you feel good in therapy all the time, and that if you're not feeling good in therapy, then you're receiving "bad therapy." This is far from accurate, and this perception can prematurely end treatments for people that may have been very useful and effective if this phenomenon was better understood. On a fundamental level, therapy obviously does need a foundation of safety, support, trust, and caring between therapist and client. But therapy is complicated. Change is complicated. Life is complicated.
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Divorce

Can Therapy Be Misused?

Maybe "misused" isn't a great word since it implies a form of external judgment. Therapy is generally whatever the person seeking therapy needs it to be. The purpose of therapy is different for each person; and what is therapeutic is also different for each person. Some may desire a person to be with them through the various daily life issues that present, and have someone to turn to who will fully hear, understand, and care for them no matter what comes up in life; someone else may want a deeper understanding of themselves in order to change repetitive and painful life patterns; others may want help with a more concrete approach to changing a specific behavior; some others may desire to have a person to whom they can show the most vulnerable parts of themselves, even if these parts aren't "pretty". Or it could be a combination of all of these, and more. The list goes on... However, it is worth giving further thought to a point I've seen come up from various perspectives in the therapy world.
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Divorce

How to Be Happy

Happiness is quite complicated, yet at the same time it really doesn't have to be. The problem with happiness is that there are certain fantasies that people hold onto that really distort a healthy sense of happiness. That being said, when it comes down to it, "happiness" is whatever it means for each person. However, movies, tv, media, and others have strongly influenced unrealistic expectations for what some people expect happiness to be.
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Divorce

Why Depression is So Difficult

I'm not naive enough (at least I don't think?) to think that I have the one reason that depression is such a difficult state of being. Depression has a different root for everyone -- and it's often a collection of sources, rather than just one thing contributing to depression. That being said, there is an overarching theme that I see with how people who are in depressive states experience depression, versus how people who are not in depressive states feel about depression.
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Family

“How Does That Make You Feel?” — The Therapy Cliche

People love to make fun of the stereotyped therapy party line: "How does that make you feel?" Yes, it's one of the biggest cliches in the therapy field, however what this question stands for still remains an important piece of psychotherapy. When people come in for therapy, it's generally because they aren't happy with the way they are feeling, in one way or another. Whether it's about relationships, depression, anxiety, stress, jobs, career, or any other areas of life, the reasons people start therapy is both to help the concrete, external situations, but overall it's how these situations makes someone feel that matters most. Basically, if you're feeling good about something, then you probably wouldn't seek emotional help with it.
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Divorce

Surviving The Great Holiday Depression

As we well know, while the holidays can be a source of joy for many people, the holidays are also a source of sadness for many others. If you're someone who finds it generally depressing to check your Facebook wall and see all of the images of happiness, then imagine all the television shows and commercials, the decorations in stores and on people's homes, the grocery stores, and shopping malls all reflecting the enthusiasm of your Facebook wall, with a joint holiday theme. It may sound nice if we're living in your favorite holiday movies, but not if you're someone who struggles just to get through the holidays each year without breaking down.
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Divorce

Relationships and Social Anxiety: Who Are We Really Hiding From?

People often prefer to believe that it's possible to hide pieces of ourselves that we don't want people to see, often exaggerating certain qualities in order to conceal others: Some may try to act in an overly nice manner in order to avoid being seen with anger or hostility; some may try to speak with perfect grammar and vocabulary, so they aren't seen as uneducated or immature; some may act more aggressively and tough in order to hide perceived weaknesses, such as caring, empathic, and loving qualities; some may be overly accommodating in order to cover up tendencies toward rigidity; some may try to appear more "businesslike" in an attempt to conceal a less organized and less adult version of themselves; some may show excessive happiness and heightened energy level while trying to prevent people from seeing internal feelings of sadness and emptiness; etc.
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