Archives for Parenting

Divorce

Can Therapy Be Misused?

Maybe "misused" isn't a great word since it implies a form of external judgment. Therapy is generally whatever the person seeking therapy needs it to be. The purpose of therapy is different for each person; and what is therapeutic is also different for each person.

Some may desire a person to be with them through the various daily life issues that present, and have someone to turn to who will fully hear, understand, and care for them no matter what comes up in life; someone else may want a deeper understanding of themselves in order to change repetitive and painful life patterns; others may want help with a more concrete approach to changing a specific behavior; some others may desire to have a person to whom they can show the most vulnerable parts of themselves, even if these parts aren't "pretty". Or it could be a combination of all of these, and more. The list goes on...

However, it is worth giving further thought to a point I've seen come up from various perspectives in the therapy world.

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Divorce

Why Depression is So Difficult

I'm not naive enough (at least I don't think?) to think that I have the one reason that depression is such a difficult state of being. Depression has a different root for everyone -- and it's often a collection of sources, rather than just one thing contributing to depression.

That being said, there is an overarching theme that I see with how people who are in depressive states experience depression, versus how people who are not in depressive states feel about depression.

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Divorce

Are You Becoming Your Parents?

It's one of the most subtle, underlying questions that I hear in various forms nearly every day in my office. Some version of, "Am I going to become like my parents?", or "Please don't let me turn into my parents."

Some people believe that they are doomed to the fate of carrying on their parents worst qualities, while others try their hardest to be as different from their parents and their parents' values as possible with the hope of drowning out any possible identification with their parents.

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Family

“How Does That Make You Feel?” — The Therapy Cliche

People love to make fun of the stereotyped therapy party line: "How does that make you feel?" Yes, it's one of the biggest cliches in the therapy field, however what this question stands for still remains an important piece of psychotherapy.

When people come in for therapy, it's generally because they aren't happy with the way they are feeling, in one way or another. Whether it's about relationships, depression, anxiety, stress, jobs, career, or any other areas of life, the reasons people start therapy is both to help the concrete, external situations, but overall it's how these situations makes someone feel that matters most. Basically, if you're feeling good about something, then you probably wouldn't seek emotional help with it.

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Divorce

The Value of Therapy: Opening the Past…to Create Change and Happiness in the Present

It can be difficult to appreciate who we are. There's so much each of us has to offer to each other, and so much to offer the world. It would be nice if everyone could look at themselves and realize the power they possess within themselves.

Unfortunately, it isn't so easy. We feel the pain, hurt, and rejection  more than we feel the happiness, satisfaction, achievements, general positives, and so on. As a result, we end up with depression, anxiety, addiction, repeated unhealthy relationships, and more.

Wouldn't it be nice if we could just let the negatives roll off of our backs, rather than holding onto them to the point of emotional injury? Obviously, it's not a conscious decision. We don't desire to hold onto the negatives, but when the hits are painful and repeated, eventually we're going to get hurt. I imagine it more along the lines of rug burn. At first, it's not such a big deal, but if you experience it repeatedly, it becomes raw and painful.

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Divorce

How to Change a Struggling Relationship Into a Healthy Relationship

This is the "part 2" to the article "10 Signs You May Be in an Unhealthy Relationship".

It was brought to my attention that in the first article I made points of the things to keep an eye on, however I made few suggestions of how to handle those ten points. So this article is to address how to handle the ten signs of an unhealthy relationship that were listed in the previous article.

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Divorce

10 Signs You May Be in an Unhealthy Relationship

Technically, a relationship needs to only be defined by the people who are in the relationship. What is a "good (or healthy) relationship" for two people may be completely different than a "good (or healthy) relationship" for two other people.

However, there is a difference between a relationship having its own shape and character, and a relationship that is either harmful or generally unhealthy for one or both partners. These relationships can be difficult to spot from the inside because one or both partners grow accustomed to the life of the relationship. Denial can also be a factor due to fears of change, failure, or otherwise. So while it may seem like it should be obvious when you're in an unhealthy relationship, it isn't always so simple.

Here are some signs of concern within relationships. Note, the presence of one or more of the following signs doesn't necessarily mean you should end your relationship. These are things to keep an eye on, and if they persist, may need further attention in order to improve the state of your relationship.

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Divorce

Life Is a Fluid, Not a Solid

What does that even mean, anyway...life is a fluid? (Some may prefer to say "liquid", but I'm sticking with "fluid").

People often perceive life as a series of idealized milestone events, all of which have general time markers on them. Some learn to drive around age 16-18; at 18 they graduate high school and maybe go to college; at 21 they can order a drink; at 22 enter the "real world" or consider graduate school; maybe late 20's early 30's get married; couple years after, have children; then the extended period of work and family life; then children off to college 18 years later (with the repetition of milestones along the way for the children); then retirement around 65-70; then eventually, we're done.

While obviously there are exceptions to these milestones, it's striking for how many people this is the somewhat "solid" perception of life. The problem is, life isn't usually so easily planned out, and when things don't go according to this type of plan, it can lead to depression, anxiety, hopelessness, lowered self-esteem, and other manifestations of fear and disappointment.

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Divorce

Hiding Behind Technology To Be Mean

Have you ever heard anyone use the phrase "hiding behind your computer?" It's something that's become increasingly common in the world of technology. People somehow feel safer and stronger to be mean, breakup, or communicate other negative emotions to others when they do it through email, text, IM, etc.

Why is this easier? It may not be the answer you think.

The obvious answer is that it's less threatening to be mean -- or disappointing in other ways -- to a person when not face-to-face, or voice-to-voice over the phone. Some will say that they don't want to hurt someone else's feelings, or face the consequences of irritating or disappointing them -- such as seeing their facial expression change, or risk being yelled at, or some other notable and visible reaction.

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Divorce

Ending Arguments

Relationships all have their bumpy moments. Some happen more than others, but relationships that last are able to move forward from these moments without getting caught up in the bumps for lengthy periods of time.

One of the notable issues I've witnessed time and again in my practice are opposing (and complementary) processes that often occur between people in relationships. What tends to happen in an argument is that one person wants to immediately resolve the issue, while the other wants to get away from the conflict.

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