Archives for Praise

Boundaries

Drowning in Love: What’s Too Much of a Good Thing?

Definitions of smothering love: To express your love for someone too much; to cover someone or something completely; to insulate, to overwhelm.

Parenting is one of the hardest jobs around. Especially here, especially now, in our rapidly moving, constantly changing modern world. Most parents seek out this job willingly and joyfully with the best of intentions. Doesn't everyone want to raise happy healthy children who grow up into competent independent adults? Of course. So...
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Boundaries

The Age of Enlightenment or the Age of Entitlement?

Fasten your seat belts and prepare for some disturbing trends showing up in America these about what these statistics and stories all have in
Spending More than We Earn
Americans spend trillion dollars on their credit cards each year. Sadly, over 40% are spending more money than they are earning. Studies show that people spend far more money using credit cards than they would spend if they were paying with...
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Communication

How To Enhance Your Kids’ (And Your Own) Motivation: Part 2

”The trouble with most of us is that we would rather be ruined by praise than saved by criticism." - Norman Vincent Peale

In Part 1 about motivation, we learned how intrinsic motivation, the built-in desire to learn and to grow, is far more powerful than extrinsic motivation at sustaining good habits. One of the hotly debated topics in the field concerns the use of praise. Does praise help motivate kids to work harder or does it do just the opposite?

Although research about the perils of too much praise on children's learning is not new, it is so important that it bears repeating. Here's the punchline: praise may do more harm than good.

One of the leaders of this inquiry is psychologist Carol Dweck at Stanford University. Her original article entitled "Praise for Intelligence Can Undermine Children's Motivation and Performance," was published with Claudia Mueller from Columbia University in 1998, and it created quite a stir since the prevailing belief at the time was that praise helped increase motivation.
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