Depression Articles

How To Start Loving Your Unmotivated Self

Thursday, February 13th, 2014

You exist in the present moment. But there are other versions of yourself, too — versions of you who also deserve your love, caring, and gratitude. Who are they, and how can express gratitude toward them?


Withdrawing From Celexa: Yeah, Um, That Didn’t Really Work

Sunday, January 12th, 2014

That’s where I gave up. If I couldn’t even check the mail without Xanax, I couldn’t survive day-to-day life with a fetus swimming around in my uterus. Would it drown in my adrenaline?


Feeling Crappy About Winter, Part 2: Grumble Along With Me

Sunday, January 5th, 2014

Sure, I can give you all sorts of great tips for managing anxiety — stuff I’ve learned through therapy, reading, and experience — but sometimes I’m just flummoxed by my own moods.


Feeling Crappy About Winter, Part 1: Drowning In All The Messiness

Saturday, January 4th, 2014

Call this “ars bloggetica”, if you will. Am I, as a mental health blogger, obligated to stay on the shiny side? Am I allowed to be pessimistic and negative?


The Post-Holiday Slump: The Presence Of An Absence

Sunday, December 29th, 2013

Christmas is so bright and happy, but January and February are full of snow, dark, and mental yuck. This is not an easy transition.


Still Life With Anxiety: An In-The-Moment Internal Monologue of Negative Thinking

Friday, October 25th, 2013

I shouldn’t feel scared that I’m woozy. I shouldn’t have to do things at the last minute. I shouldn’t be a procrastinator. I should be having fun putting costumes together.


Apple’s Siri Finally Delivers Suicide Prevention Info

Friday, June 21st, 2013

Apple’s Siri: sometimes clever, sometimes caustic. After a year of referring suicidal users to the nearest bridge, Siri’s latest patch includes contact information for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline.


‘Major Scaled’: Dipping Your iPod in Liquid Prozac

Sunday, January 20th, 2013

“Major Scaled”: it’s like dipping your iPod into a vat of liquid Prozac. Listen as this artist digitally converts minor-scaled songs into major-scaled songs.


Anxiety Society: Coping, But Without the Luxury of Sight

Monday, November 26th, 2012
Anxiety Society: Coping, But Without the Luxury of Sight(This is the sixteenth post in a series called “Anxiety Society”, in which I interview everyday anxiety sufferers from all walks of life about their struggles, their triumphs, their coping methods, and more. I believe that the more we openly talk about our mental health, the less of a “thing” it becomes. Conversation can reduce stigma, and my interviewees want to be a part of that.)

Meet Sveta.

She loves music, listening to bird calls, and reading. Although she’s just in her early twenties, she’s already been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder and dysthymia. Her diagnoses follow a difficult and abusive childhood.

What makes Sveta’s story a bit different from most stories of PTSD and abuse is this: she’s also blind.

Although she can perceive colors and shapes, and distinguish between light and dark, that’s the extent of her visual ability. The blindness affects everything from her ability to escape triggering situations to her anxiety coping strategies. Her parents still largely control the minutae of her everyday life, so Sveta finds herself struggling to carve out her own strategies for controlling her environment.

Summer: Have you always been blind, or were you able to see at some point in your life?

Sveta: I was born 3 months and 2 weeks early. I was put on oxygen because I couldn’t breathe. The result was that not only could I breathe, but the blood vessels in my eyes grew too fast, forcing the retina and the eye apart.

SB: And you suffer from an anxiety disorder, correct? Do you mind sharing your diagnoses?

S: I have been diagnosed with dysthymia, also known as chronic depression and complex PTSD, which is like BPD but to a lesser degree.

SB: Do you feel the dysthymia was always present, or did it develop at some point in your life?

S: The dysthymia was always there for as long as I can remember. My parents used to make fun of my love for minor keys saying, “You only like songs where someone dies”. This, of course, isn’t true. I like the minor key, not the death. It happens, sometimes, that songs where someone dies are in minor keys. It also happens that in songs in minor keys, sometimes, someone dies.


Do You Have an Invisible Illness? Join Me on Tuesday for #HAchat

Monday, September 10th, 2012

Has anyone ever accused you of malingering — that is, faking sick? It’s all too common for those of us with illnesses that can’t easily be detected by the untrained everyman.


Panic
About Anxiety



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