Video: Earthquake On Live TV? These Anchors Calmly Own ItLast night before bed, I found myself putzing around on my iPhone on my living room floor.

It’s a nightly thing: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Reddit. Rinse and repeat if I’m still not sleepy.

But I was caught off guard while scrolling mindlessly through my Facebook news feed — suddenly, I felt the floor shake.

Always on high alert, I jumped. What was that?

After a moment or two of frozen uncertainty, I audibly exhaled when I realized the source of the shaking: a heavy diesel truck, barreling down my street.

SHAKING ON THE INSIDE OR THE OUTSIDE?

I live on the east coast — far from any real fault lines — but ever since that magnitude 5.8 earthquake in Virginia (that rumbled all the way to up to my apartment in Pennsylvania) back in 2011, I’ve been a bit leery of any shaking.

For the record, and I’m being completely serious here, I was meditating when the earthquake hit.

Yeah — meditating! That thing that’s supposed to, you know, relieve anxiety?

I’d taken a “mental health day” from work and spent a good half hour laying on my living room floor during the afternoon, relaxing my muscles and sinking into my breath.

There’s nothing like a few wall-hung photographs slapping against the drywall to knock me out of my meditative reverie.

It was my first earthquake, and I hope it’s my last — but still, three odd years later, even a passing diesel truck will put me on high alert.

“EARTHQUAKE! WE’RE HAVING AN EARTHQUAKE.”

That’s why I so admire the KTLA news anchors who let cooler heads prevail during last week’s actual St. Patrick’s Day earthquake in Los Angeles. They exhibit a stress response to a very real trigger — shaking ground on a major fault line — yet still manage to remain composed:

Oh, if only I could react so logically and calmly to my own anxiety triggers! I long for the day when I can just hold up my right hand, announce my trigger, and then calmly proceed to deal with it rationally.

Right now: “Heart racing? Ohmygod. It won’t stop. Two seconds have passed and it still won’t stop. This must be a heart attack, and I am certainly going to die.”

My ideal future: “Heart racing? Ahh yes, it’s true — my heart is racing, folks!” (Holds pointer finger in the air like the KTLA anchor.) “I shall now sit down and watch a funny TV show until those beats return to their normal rate.”

Do your triggers send you into insta-panic mode or have you figured out a way to respond to your triggers thoughtfully?

Photo: Bjørn Giesenbauer (Flickr)

 


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    Last reviewed: 25 Mar 2014

APA Reference
Beretsky, S. (2014). Video: Earthquake On Live TV? These Anchors Calmly Own It. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 1, 2014, from http://blogs.psychcentral.com/panic/2014/03/video-earthquake-on-live-tv-these-anchors-calmly-own-it/

 

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