Death and Dying Articles

Emotional Ownership in Parenting in “Rachel Getting Married”

Saturday, October 15th, 2011

In Rachel Getting Married (2008), Anne Hathaway plays Kym, who is released from rehab in order to go to her sister Rachel’s wedding, which takes place at the home of her father, Paul and step-mother, Carol. The particular scene I’ve chosen illustrates what happens when a parent doesn’t or won’t acknowledge his or her proper share of accountability and responsibility; the child is then left holding all of the guilt, until such point that as an adult, the child comes to her own inner understanding as to how things really were.


Terrence Malick’s ‘The Tree of Life’: Consolation for the Grieving Process

Monday, October 10th, 2011

Terrence Malick’s latest film, The Tree of Life, comes out this week on DVD. Beginning with its opening quotation from The Book of Job, through its 15-minute visual history of the universe, to its cryptic ending, this is a film that invites questions about “meaning” as well as the writer/director’s intent.

Admirers and critics have written extensively about the film’s “message” — search the Internet and you’ll find hundreds of comments that describe particular scenes and discuss their symbolism. While many viewers seem perplexed by this movie, to me it offers a fairly straight-forward New Age message about life, death and the source of true consolation during the grieving process.


Exploring Covert Incest in “The Ballad of Jack and Rose”

Thursday, September 8th, 2011

Rebecca Miller’s “The Ballad of Jack and Rose” (2005) presents an intimate look at how father-daughter relationships can cross the line into covert or emotional incest. Rose (Camilla Belle) is the 16-year old daughter of terminally ill Jack (Daniel Day-Lewis). They have been living in isolation, just the two of them, on a small island, the site of a failed commune; Rose’s mother had long since left. From the start, we get the feeling of a complicit, intimate, and closed system between father and daughter. Not only has Rose taken the role of “wife” in the household, but having home-schooled her, Jack has shut her off from developing relationships with others.


Exploring the Empty Nest in “The Kids Grow Up”

Saturday, August 27th, 2011

Like many good films, books or conversations, independent filmmaker Doug Block’s “The Kids Grow Up” can stimulate our own self-inquiry, leading us to ask ourselves questions about where we are with the topic presented. More than supplying answers, these kinds of works elicit personal examination, much as Block did in his excellent documentary, “51 Birch Street,” examining his parents’ marriage. In “The Kids Grow Up,” he provides an interesting road map of the terrain of one of mid-life’s milestones: when our kids leave home. One of the many questions this film poses is what our lives as parents are going to be like after this bittersweet passage.


 

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Recent Comments
  • Marla Estes: I must say that the book was better. I can’t really remember but there may have been several...
  • becky: Thought-provoking critique of a film I’ve never seen tho i adore Alan Arkin and it sounds like the...
  • Marla Estes, MA: Thanks for your comment, Michael. I agree. Journeying together indeed, Marla
  • Michael: Marla, This happens to be one of my favorite movies. I fell in love with Diane Lane after seeing this movie...
  • Cristina Laird: I agree with Lorrie. Yes, he is a man, he is from the human race. But, he is also a genius, a very...
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