One thing we’ve learned about the brain over the last 15 years is that it can form new neural connections throughout the lifespan. This is called neuroplasticity, you may have heard of it. Neuroplasticity occurs when we practice and repeat doing things and eventually it just become automatic, like a habit. We see this in walking, talking, learning new car routes, playing an instrument or even meditation. When it comes to the enormous repetition of a constant connection to our technology, you have to assume, or likely you’ve experienced that the brain is strengthening that habit often times with a stressful cost.

Technology is great, but we’re just infants with it and we have to begin evolving with a wiser relationship.

Not too long ago humans had many uninterrupted spaces in their lives. If you were sitting at lunch with a friend the focus was on the conversation and there weren’t many things that would intrude. Now the brain has rewired to constantly monitor beneath your awareness any incoming messages and if there is a sign of one, a knee-jerk reaction occurs to check it.

Sherry Turkle from MIT and author of Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other, has been studying this for decades. She talks about

One Comment to
Stress Less and Optimize Your Relationship with Technology

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  1. hey. how’s life? those people with facebook circles and constant feedback on their lives are pretty wild. they’re not all soulless, though it might seem that way. it helps to find people who aren’t convinced of their own goodness, because they’re kinda weak as allies. i think my one friend who has like a zillion linkedin connections is pretty in tune with evil, and i really wished i could have teamed up with him.

    joining forces to create an elite team of allies is sacred.

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