Throughout our lives we’ve been interpreting and making meaning out of all kinds of events. Every event by itself is just an event, but the way we see it, the importance we give it, how it weaves into the fabric of our cells makes all the difference. This meaning that we make then goes on to affect how we interpret other things, it informs the choices that we make and the behaviors that we conduct.

For example, if I were to get pulled over by the police for speeding I might think “the world is out to get me” or “I need to slow down.” I may miss the possibility that this may have saved me from an upcoming accident. Some people say life is like a blank canvas, go ahead and paint your masterpiece.

The problem with that statement is that life is not like a blank canvas because we bring all of our past experiences, woundings, traumas, and triumphs with us to the seat. These inform that immediate snap judgment that occurs beneath our awareness in any given moment.

2 Comments to
The Happiest People Don’t Have the Best of Everything

Before posting, please read our blog moderation guidelines. The comments below begin with the oldest comments first. Click on the last comments page to jump to the most recent comments.

  1. It is true that our interpretations of events can differ vastly according to our past experiences and our level of emotional health.

    But is happiness a result of seeing things positively (hence the “see things positively” advice) or is a positive outlook a result of happiness and emotional health? Because it the latter is true the “see things positively” advice is useless, if not cruel – a little bit like saying “walk” to a tetraplegic.

    But again, I suppose the answer is both, the old chicken and egg story. We need to integrate and heal old trauma in order to have a positive outlook, but it does not hurt to try to see things more positively in order to get better.

  2. THis hit me as all together true and something we don’t often think about. Thanks for spotlighting so profound of way of looking at things!

Join the Conversation!

Before posting, please read our blog moderation guidelines.

Post a Comment:


(Required, will be published)

(Required, but will not be published)

(Optional)

Mindfulness & Psychotherapy



Subscribe to this Blog:
Feed


Or Get a Single, Daily Email (enter email address):

via FeedBurner



Archives


Blogroll



Books and CDs by Dr. Elisha Goldstein:
Mindfulness Meditations for the Anxious Traveler: Quick Exercises to Calm Your Mind
The Now Effect: How This Moment Can Change The Rest of Your Life

A Mindfulness-Based
Stress Reduction Workbook Mindful Solutions for Stress, Anxiety and Depression
 

Subscribe to this Blog:
Feed


Or Get a Single, Daily Email (enter email address):

via FeedBurner



Recent Comments
  • Elisha Goldstein, Ph.D.: Hi again, Just to clarify, if you’ve never commented before the system will hold any...
  • Elisha Goldstein, Ph.D.: Hi WDDT, Thanks for letting me know of these corrections, I’m a perpetual student....
  • WDDT: Why, how dare I say thing like this! Am I not aware that comments like this are hurtful and the moderator will...
  • WDDT: No offense, but where did Elisha get his PhD from? I hope his thesis didn’t include phrases like:...
  • Emily Wright: Mindful teaches us compassion, compassion to live every moment to the fullest and not let past or...
Subscribe to Our Weekly Newsletter

Find a Therapist
Enter ZIP or postal code



Users Online: 12240
Join Us Now!