Archives for General

Altruism

How to Fall in Love and Uncover Happiness in Four Minutes or Less

One of the primary pathways to an enduring happiness is facilitating a sense of connection. When we feel connected we feel balanced, when we feel balanced, we often feel happy. The problem is
as we grow up in this world, we have to learn how to shield ourselves from vulnerability and so we build up walls or put on armor that make connection more difficult.

One of the most powerful (and challenging) practices to do is look into another person's eyes for a prolonged period of time as it immediately makes us feel vulnerable. It may not matter whether it's a stranger or someone you've been in a partnership with for over 50 years (sometimes this makes it more difficult). But when we do it, it's fascinating what arises.

Check out this short video from Soul Pancake to see some of the surprising results of people making connection:

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General

The Mindful Way Through Stress: An Interview with Shamash Alidina

Stress seems to be the underlying issue with many of our aversive conditions whether they're psychological or physical. My good friend Shamash Alidina, author of the international bestselling book Mindfulness For Dummies and his newest release The Mindful Way through Stress: The Proven 8-Week Path to Health, Happiness, and Well-Being, comes to us today to share the direction of mindfulness in our culture, how it impacts his life and a couple quick tips from his book to get us started.

Elisha: Welcome Shamash!

Shamash: Great to be here with you.

Elisha: Mindfulness is enjoying quite a boon in the West, where do you see mindfulness currently in our culture and where is it going?

Shamash: I think mindfulness is still very much in its infancy in our culture. The general public hears about it from time to time, but I don’t think it’s still fully accepted. But we’re certainly on the path towards that happening. The level of interest in mindfulness and it’s growth is exponential at the moment. As for the future, I don’t know! I have little doubt that in the next year, the research evidence will continue to
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Anxiety

Baby Steps to an Anti-Depressant Brain

Let’s keep this simple.

You may or may not have heard by now that our brain is wired to pay attention more frequently, and with great veracity, to what’s negative. This doesn't mean that the good moments in life aren't happening, we’re just not wired to pay attention to them.

Why?

Because as a human race, we’re wired to survive, not be happy.

BUT,

I have a theory that in this moment in time we’re going through an evolution as a species where because of the overabundance of things pulling our attention, we’re being thrusted into growing our awareness – the kind of awareness that breeds balance, well-being and a greater sense of what matters.

So people are being turned onto mindfulness more. More spaces are offering it, more institutions are studying it and there’s greater media to
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Depression

3 Steps to Make Your New Habits Stick this Year

Whether we like it or not, this time of year cues our minds to reflect and think about habits we want to change.  If you're reading this blog, odds are one of those habits are bringing mindfulness into your life more and allowing this to be the year where it sticks. Or maybe you're also looking to change other habits that run alongside your values like being more self-compassion, living alongside your values, playing more or creating more mastery in life. All of these are basic elements that help uncover happiness.

Whatever the habit is that you want to make, here are a few practical tips to help make your changes stick.

Know the practice – If you’re trying to integrate the ability to become more present in your daily life, choose what you want to practice. You may want to integrate more formal practice that would come in the form of a
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compassion

The Power of a Simple Hug as a Natural Anti-Depressant

There's really nothing like the power of a big supportive hug. The body reads a sense of caring in the human touch. When we're hugged we sense that on a deep level, we are not alone. In some ways it's a shame that in our relationships with healing professionals hugging is often advised against.

There are so many wonderful stories where hugging has been a healing modality.

The Science and Practice of a Hug

In one study published in
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General

MBCT for Depression Anywhere, Anytime: An Interview with Zindel Segal, PhD

Over a decade ago, Zindel Segal, Mark Williams and John Teasdale developed Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) for helping people not relapse into depression. Over time study after study has come out showing the positive impact MBCT has in relapse depression. I've taught this program many many times and have seen the transformative power of it firsthand. At the same time I would get emails from people across the country asking if I knew if it was in their area. Often times it wasn't, but now Zindel Segal and Sona Dimidjian have solved that problem.

Today, Zindel talks to us about a new online program called Mindful Noggin that can bring MBCT to you anywhere, anytime.

Elisha: The Mindful Noggin is a great name, what exactly is it and how do you see it pushing the needle forward on integrating MBCT into our daily lives?
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General

The Neuroscience of Bad Habits and Why It’s Not About Will Power

Why are bad habits so hard to break? What if the bumper sticker "Just Say No!" actually works against us? If willpower were the answer to breaking bad habits then we wouldn't have drug addiction or obesity. There's something going on in our brains where we literally lose the ability for self-control, but all hope isn't lost.

Nora Volkow, head of the National Institute on Drug Abuse calls the phrase "Just Say No!" "magical thinking."

It appears that dopamine is one of the main chemicals regulating the pleasure center of the brain. At the most basic level, it regulates motivation -- it sends signals to receptors in the brain saying, "This feels good!"

Whether you're a heroin addict and you see an association to heroin, you're a caffeine addict and you see a cup of coffee, you’re a Smartphone addict and you see another person pick up their phone, or if you're hungry and you see some good-looking food, your brain rushes with dopamine and that is now caught on brain-scanning machines.

The fascinating thing is that Volkow has found that  the images alone affect the rise of dopamine in our brains. So if we pass a McDonald's and see the arches, our brain associates that with a tasty hamburger (for some) and shoots up dopamine. That good feeling will unconsciously drive the motivation to go in and get a Big Mac. It's a conditioned response. The same goes for anything including most likely our relationships to our phones.

What can we do? 

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General

This Instruction May Seem Simple, Yet it is Very Profound

Make this week a week to be mindful of your diet.

Not just the food you take in, but what you take into all of your senses -- into your eyes, ears, nose, mouth and sense of touch.

What kind of diet are you feeding your senses?

Are they on sensory overload from too much interaction with digital devices? Is there too much time with the news?

What good things might you bring into your diet? Is...
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General

Jews and Arabs Refuse to Be Enemies: A Compassionate Response to War

Henry David Thoreau said, "It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see."

At some point in our development we learn to see others through a lens of fear and hate. Because the brain is so malleable in our younger years these beliefs become that much more ingrained and as we grow older the skew of our lens becomes hardened. When it comes to the Middle East, it seems there is a collective lens that's been hardened through history that Arabs and Jews have an irreconcilable relationship.  There seems to be a social construction of hopelessness that we're all entranced in. But if hate and ignorance are learned, is it possible they can be unlearned?

The reality is nobody has "the answer" to this conflict and the historical trauma on both sides runs deep. When safety feels threatened, as is a continual reality there, it's a natural survival reaction to close down the mind and heart in order to protect against vulnerability and default to a fight or flight response. If someone was shooting arrows at you, you'd put up your shield and either run or eventually shoot back. At the same time, I know there are many people on both sides, if not the majority, that see the common humanity between each other, want deeply to feel safe and protected, and long to live in peace.

From thoughts come actions and from actions comes consequences.

Read through the intentions and pictures below in the following "Compassionate Peace Practice." Set your judgments aside for a moment and see if you can bring them into your heart and mind when considering all those who are suffering in this war.
A Compassionate Peace Practice (Share Generously):
"May all those who have suffered violence and all those who have committed violence feel safe and protected from inner and outer harm (because if they did feel safe they'd be less like to commit violent acts)."

"May all those in conflict be awakened to their common humanity."
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