flyerRecent I had an eye opening dream while I was asleep.

I was in a war torn region and superheroes existed (Keep in mind I have a couple younger kids).

I was injured somehow, but some of these superheroes were telling me I could fly.

As I tried to fly, I felt a little lift but kept falling.

A few people who were the enemy were chasing me and I was afraid. I ran and tried to fly, but couldn’t get that far (At this point you are welcome to psychoanalyze me).

The superheroes told me:

“You have to believe, believe you can fly and you can do it.”

At that point I decided to risk it, I leaned it a bit further and took a leap (literally and figuratively), believing that if I did this I would fly.

Lo’ and behold I was up in the air flying around. I couldn’t believe it.

As the dream continued I was able to help some people, but I would lose my belief from time to time and had trouble getting up in the air.

I remembered the words, “You have to believe, believe you can fly and you can do it.” I risked again, took the leap…

…and was able to fly.

When I woke up I was blown away at the clear meaning behind this dream.

Life is difficult at times; so many stressors come at us from all angles. Sometimes when we’re struggling with anxiety, depression, addiction or trauma it feels like a war torn country inside. We each are active participants in our health and well-being and have within us the power to soar higher than we often believe we can.

The mind is so powerful. Henry Ford once said, “Whether you believe you can or you can’t, you’re right.” So often we are riddled with the belief that we can’t risk, that we can’t be vulnerable, and so we walk around with ourselves and in our relationships with all our armor on. Change almost never comes without risk.

Do we have within us the natural capacities to face and overcome our stress, anxiety, depression, addiction and even trauma? Absolutely, I’ve seen it over and over again. Even after we believe in ourselves and find success, is it possible to lose that belief and struggle again. Definitely, but it’s important to keep learning how to come back to that belief.

One thing that’s helpful to practice is making the mental shift from what I “CAN’T” do to what I “CAN” do. When we can create space for what we CAN do, it can be enormously powerful what we find.

Even if what we find is the recognition that we need other people or a higher power to give us the strength to heal from our wounds.

Sometimes it’s good to listen to our dreams. Mine taught  me:

The first step to transformation is taking the leap to believe in ourselves.

As always, please share your thoughts, stories and questions below. Your interaction creates a living wisdom for us all to benefit from.

Flying man image available from Shutterstock.

 


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    Last reviewed: 25 May 2014

APA Reference
Goldstein, E. (2014). The Power of Belief: Why You Have Exactly What You Need to Heal. Psych Central. Retrieved on July 22, 2014, from http://blogs.psychcentral.com/mindfulness/2014/05/the-power-of-belief-why-you-have-exactly-what-you-need-to-heal/

 

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