having a conversationNot too long ago I was standing with a friend who recently separated from his wife. As he was telling me about his current struggles my body started to get tense and unsolicited advice followed.

I noticed something didn’t feel right in the interaction, but I felt stuck between not saying anything and giving advice. At one point he responded, “You know, it would just have been better if you were a little more curious about my experience instead of giving me advice.”

In that moment, a light bulb went off in my mind and I found the third way.  Now I try to bring curiosity more often to our relationship and it has been enormously helpful.

Adopting the intention and attitude of curiosity is a cornerstone of mindfulness practice and is also a wonderful thing to bring to our relationships.

As human beings we all want to feel understood and cared about, this is what gives us a sense of acceptance, that we belong. Curiosity enables this because it says, “I’m interested in you, I’m paying attention, I care about you.” This often allows people’s guards to come down creating opportunity for connection.

If we practiced curiosity we’d be less likely to fall into the mind trap of Mindreading. This is when we just assume what another person is thinking. When the boss walks by without smiling we know it’s because we did something wrong, or she was stressed, or she must have information about company layoffs. Or when we get home and someone in our family is irritable, we know it’s because they had a bad day, are mad at us, or are depressed. We all know what assuming gets us.

So today, practice being a bit more curious in your relationships. Intentionally check your automatic judgments at the door and dig a little deeper. Instead of jumping to conclusions you might ask “What do you mean by that?” or “How was that for you?” or “I’m not sure I understand, could you say more?”

We can all try and be a bit more curious with our husbands, wives, children, partners, colleagues, employees, bosses or whoever.

Try it out, you may just like it.

As always, please share your thoughts, stories and questions below. Your interaction creates a living wisdom for us all to benefit from.

Photo by Chip Griffin, available under a Creative Commons attribution license.

 


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    Last reviewed: 27 Jan 2011

APA Reference
Goldstein, E. (2011). Want Better Relationships? Get Curious. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 23, 2014, from http://blogs.psychcentral.com/mindfulness/2011/01/want-better-relationships-get-curious/

 

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